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What you need to know about DVR on Philo

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The best deal in live TV streaming includes free DVR.

Once you’ve decided to make the jump to streaming TV, there are things to consider, like if your new service has DVR. On-Demand doesn’t cover all of your favorite shows, so DVR is an essential tool to make sure you never miss a moment. But not all DVR services the same; they all have their own ticks. Here’s everything you need to know about on Philo DVR: how much it costs, how it works, and where it might fall short.  

Philo DVR cost

DVR is a standard feature on most streaming TV services. YouTube TV, FuboTV, and PlayStation Vue each offer DVR as a baseline feature. Philo is no exception. Subscribers get DVR included in the cost of their $16-per-month Philo membership. You don’t need to do anything special or activate the feature on a website; it’s waiting when you log in.  

philo dvr cost Photo via Philo

How Philo DVR works

Philo’s DVR works just like DVR does in the past: Users select the program they’d like to save, select the record option, and then watch when they have time. Best of all, you don’t need to be watching a channel to record what’s playing on it.

While Philo’s DVR is largely standard, it does have a few cool features.

Users can fast-forward and rewind during their recordings to avoid those nagging commercials. Some services, like Hulu with Live TV, make users pay a premium to skip ads, and some block fast-forwarding through the ads entirely. Skipping ads is one area in which Philo stands out.

Another is its generous DVR space limits. Philio has no hard-stated limits on what or how much users can record. The company has promised a minimum of at least 20 hours of recording space, but the only people who should find themselves getting their DVR space restricted are heavy users. If Philo DVR does delete your recordings, it will begin with the oldest content in your library.

Philo DVR’s limitations

While Philo lets you skip ads, it’s still subject to the same limitations of all TV providers. Due to the nature of streaming deals, occasionally you’ll get a notice telling you “Recording Disabled” when you go to DVR a show. That’s because Philo doesn’t have the rights to record that program or channel where you live. In my time using Philo, this issue never popped up. But it’s clearly been an issue: The company wouldn’t mention it on its website if it wasn’t.

Also, you can only keep your DVR’d programs for 30 days. After that, they will be deleted to make room for new shows. Considering the lack of hard limitations and Philo’s budget pricing—just $16 per month—that’s quite generous. 

Philo DVR local channels

Philo doesn’t feature support for local channels in any form, so they are unavailable to save on your DVR. If missing out on local channels has got you bummed out don’t worry. We’ve collected the best ways for Philo subscribers to watch local TV right here. And here’s a complete guide to Philo channels

New to cord-cutting? Here are our picks for the best movie streaming sites of 2018 and free live TV apps and channels. If you’re looking for a specific channel, here’s how to watch HBO, Showtime, Starz, Sundance TV, ESPN, ESPN2, ESPN3, ESPNU, Willow, AMC, FX, Fox News, Freeform, MSNBC, CNN, CNBC, FS1, TBS, TNT, Tennis Channel, Golf Channel, Syfy, HGTV, Cartoon Network/Adult Swim, Bravo, Lifetime, Discovery, PBS, the CW, BBC, CSPAN, NBA TV, MTV, Comedy Central, Food Network, TLC, HLN, A&E, Animal Planet, National Geographic, the Weather Channel, the History Channel, and NFL RedZone without cable, as well as free movies on YouTube. If you’re on the move, here’s how to watch Fox Sports Go and live stream NBC Sports.

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John-Michael Bond

John-Michael Bond

John-Michael Bond is a tech reporter and culture writer for Daily Dot. A longtime cord-cutter and early adapter, he's an expert on streaming services (Hulu with Live TV), devices (Roku, Amazon Fire), and anime. A former staff writer for TUAW, he's knowledgeable on all things Apple and Android. You can also also find him regularly performing standup comedy in Los Angeles.