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How to watch NHL games on ESPN+

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Here’s everything you need to know about ESPN’s new premium service.

ESPN+ is a godsend to hockey fans. In its first year, ESPN’s new subscription service will broadcast more than 180 NHL games during the 2018-19 season. That’s more than NBC Sports and NBC combined, and it’s easily on par with NHL Network, the league’s own streaming service. The service will also exclusively feature In the Crease, the daily hockey program co-hosted by Barry Melrose and Linda Cohn, offering highlights, interviews, and analysis from around the league. Here’s everything you need to know about the NHL on ESPN+.

nhl espn+ in the crease ESPN

What is ESPN+?

Like AMC Premiere to AMC, ESPN+ is basically a premium version of ESPN, with exclusive series and a ton of live programming. In addition to streaming NHL games, ESPN+ offers a way to watch the niche sporting events that don’t typically air on ESPN proper: a ton of boxing matches, PGA tour golf, Grand Slam Tennis, cricket, European soccer, and the United Soccer League, in addition to MLB games, MLS, and college sports. Launching in April 2018, ESPN+ also features original series that take you closer to the sports you love, most notably Kobe Bryant’s Detail, which offers deep-dive analysis on specific NBA players. Even more invaluable, it contains the complete archives of ESPN’s beloved 30 for 30 documentary series.

ESPN+ costs $4.99 per month or $49.99 per year. But to be clear, ESPN+ is not a substitute for ESPN. You can’t use your ESPN+ subscription, for example, to live stream Monday Night Football, but you can stream ESPN+ content without an ESPN subscription. (Here’s everything you to know to watch ESPN online.) The ESPN+ content is clearly marked on the ESPN site and in the WatchESPN app with the yellow E+ logo (seen below), and there’s a section devoted exclusively to ESPN+ material. As you can see in the screenshot below, games that will be blacked out in your area are clearly marked in advance.

ESPN+ cost: $4.99 per month or $49.99 per year

nhl streams ESPN+ ESPN

ESPN+ devices

I can’t stress this enough: ESPN+ is not a standalone app. You’ll need to download the WatchESPN app, and from there, you’ll be able to watch ESPN+ content, which is marked with the E+ logo. The WatchESPN app can be used with the following devices:

nhl espn devices ESPN

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NHL on ESPN+ schedule for the 2018-19 season

The NHL on ESPN+ schedule is only available through October. We’ll update this article when more programming is announced. All games are subject to blackout restrictions and listed in ET.

Friday, Oct. 19

7pm,  Florida Panthers at Washington Capitals

Saturday, Oct. 20

7pm,  Chicago Blackhawks at Columbus Blue Jackets

10pm,  Nashville Predators at Edmonton Oilers

Sunday, Oct. 21

7pm, Calgary Flames at New York Rangers

Monday, Oct. 22

7pm, Colorado Avalanche at Philadelphia Flyers

Tuesday, Oct. 23

9pm, Pittsburgh Penguins at Edmonton Oilers

Wednesday, Oct. 24

10pm, Vancouver Canucks at Vegas Golden Knights

Thursday, Oct. 25

7pm, Philadelphia Flyers at Boston Bruins

9pm, Washington Capitals at Edmonton Oilers

Friday, Oct. 26

6pm, Tampa Bay Lightning at Vegas Golden Knights

Saturday, Oct. 27

1pm, New York Islanders at Philadelphia Flyers

8pm, Chicago Blackhawks at St. Louis Blues

Sunday, Oct. 28

5pm, Dallas Stars at Detroit Red Wings

Monday, Oct. 29

10pm, Minnesota Wild at Vancouver Canucks

Tuesday, Oct. 30

7:30pm, New Jersey Devils at Tampa Bay Lightning

New to cord-cutting? Here are our picks for the best movie streaming sites of 2018 and free live TV apps and channels. If you’re looking for a specific channel, here’s how to watch HBO, Showtime, Starz, ESPN, AMC, FX, Fox News, MSNBC, CNN, FS1, TBS, TNT, Golf Channel, Cartoon Network/Adult Swim, the CW, NBA TV, the Weather Channel, and NFL RedZone without cable, as well as free movies on YouTube. If you’re on the move, here’s how to watch Fox Sports Go and live stream NBC Sports.

Austin Powell

Austin Powell

Austin Powell is the managing editor of the Daily Dot. His work focuses on the intersection of entertainment and technology. He previously served as a music columnist for the Austin Chronicle and is the co-author of The Austin Chronicle Music Anthology.