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Free DVR makes Hulu with Live TV an even sweeter deal

NiglayNik/Shutterstock (Licensed) Remix by Jason Reed

There’s an upgrade option, but you probably won’t need it.

Cutting the cord simplifies your life, but when you’re selecting your new streaming services, it’s essential to keep track of the little things. That means things like DVR, which lets you record your favorite shows even when they’re not on-demand.

While almost every streaming TV solution offers some form of DVR, not everyone offers the same features. Thankfully, Hulu with Live TV handles DVR as well as Hulu handles streaming. Here’s everything you need to know about Hulu with Live TV DVR, from what it costs to how it works and its limitations.  

hulu with live tv dvr Photo via Roku

Hulu with Live TV DVR: The Cost

DVR is a standard feature for streaming TV services, with everyone from YouTube TV and FuboTV to PlayStation Vue offering some variation of it. Hulu with Live TV is no exception, offering free cloud DVR to all subscribers. Every user gets 50 hours of space included with their subscription.

Looking for more space? Extra time is available for $14.99 per month with the enhanced cloud DVR add-on, which also adds a new feature we’ll discuss in a moment.

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How Hulu with Live TV DVR works

For the most part, you can record anything on Hulu with Live TV. But there are a few exceptions.

While Hulu doesn’t provide a list of the programs you can’t record, you won’t be able to DVR things like blacked-out local sporting events. However, this is common on all streaming TV services. One note: if you’re trying to record a sporting event, make sure to schedule your DVR to record the show after it. That way if the game goes into overtime you won’t miss any action.

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Every Hulu with Live TV account comes with 50 hours of free DVR storage. Once you’ve reached your limit, Hulu will delete your oldest recording to make extra room. For $14.99 per month, subscribers can get the enhanced cloud DVR add-on, which gives you up to 200 hours of DVR space. In addition to the extra time, the enhanced cloud DVR feature also lets viewers fast-forward through ad breaks on their records. For some viewers that feature is worth the cost by itself.

Along with DVR and a wonderful cable package, Hulu with Live TV members also get a standard Hulu subscription, which dramatically increases your on-demand offerings. Best of all, these features carry across your devices. Schedule recordings on your phone, then watch them on your TV, Xbox, or your personal other favorite Hulu device with ease.

Hulu with Live TV DVR limitations

Hulu with Live TV isn’t hampered by many problems, but for some users, the storage will be an issue. Fifty hours of DVR can fill up quickly for true TV devotees. Even with the ability to skip ads in recordings, $14.99 per month is expensive for extra DVR space. While 200 hours is a ton of space, some of the competitions are offering far more storage for less money. 

Hulu with Live TV DVR local channels

As with all streaming TV services, Hulu with Live TV can’t record games that are blacked-out for local viewers. In addition, there are some local channels on Hulu that can’t be recorded due to regional availability restrictions. Hulu with Live TV doesn’t have a public listing of which affiliates aren’t included with your cloud DVR. Accordingly, make sure you test your local channels during the free trial to make sure they’re included.

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John-Michael Bond

John-Michael Bond

John-Michael Bond is a tech reporter and culture writer for Daily Dot. A longtime cord-cutter and early adopter, he's an expert on streaming services (Hulu with Live TV), devices (Roku, Amazon Fire), and anime. A former staff writer for TUAW, he's knowledgeable on all things Apple and Android. You can also also find him regularly performing standup comedy in Los Angeles.