People are spending $1,000 on Apple keyboards because they’re gray

BTW

If you can’t afford Apple’s $5,000 (minimum) iMac Pro, here’s an idea: buy it and sell the accessories. You could recoup up to one-third of your losses given the exorbitant price people are paying for the included keyboard, mouse, and trackpad.

One eBay post lists the accessories set at $1,750, and another has a starting bid of $750. The biggest bargain of the week was posted for $450—until 23 bids in less than 72 hours brought it up to $900. Typically, you only see listings priced this high by eBay merchants trying to trick unknowing customers into spending more than they need to. But one listing that ended at $1,525 with 13 bids proves this is no scam.

Gizmodo was the first to spot the incredible prices people are charging for Apple’s space-gray accessory bundle. These ordinary computer accessories are so expensive because they can only be obtained by spending a good chunk of change on an iMac Pro, the recently released flagship all-in-one that can cost up to $13,000.

Aside from exclusivity, there’s no real reason to spend so much on these accessories. They’re not made of any special material, nor will they boost your typing accuracy. In fact, you could just purchase them together in white for around $340 (which is already more than anyone should spend on a keyboard, mouse, and trackpad).

In defense of those who have already splurged, these accessories do look cool, and there is something nostalgic about seeing Apple computer products in a color other than silver and white. Remember when Apple sold a slick black MacBook from 2006 to 2008 (which you can buy on eBay for less than $100) before it started dipping all its products in silver?

If you do have $1,000 to spare on an Apple gadget, consider the excellent iPhone X. There’s no shipping delay for the space-gray version.

H/T Business Insider

Phillip Tracy

Phillip Tracy

Phillip Tracy is a former technology staff writer at the Daily Dot. He's an expert on smartphones, social media trends, and gadgets. He previously reported on IoT and telecom for RCR Wireless News and contributed to NewBay Media magazine. He now writes for Laptop magazine.