T.I. says Nipsey Hussle’s death was ‘like losing Iron Man’

BTW

Warning: This article contains spoilers for Avengers: Endgame.

Rapper T.I. and radio host Charlamagne Tha God advocated for Opportunity Zones on Capitol Hill Wednesday. At a press conference, T.I. compared the loss of Nipsey Hussle to the loss of Iron Man in Avengers: Endgame.

In 2017, Opportunity Zones were established under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. Opportunity Zones are designed to create economic development and jobs in underprivileged areas by providing tax breaks to potential investors of those areas.

An extension of the program is currently being considered in the Senate.

T.I. was speaking about Hussle, as he was a community activist who was dedicated to rebuilding underprivileged communities, investing in Black communities, and advocating for Opportunity Zones. Hussle was set to go to Capitol Hill before his death to talk about the same issues, as well as his own initiative to advance underprivileged areas, called “Our Opportunity.”

T.I. first heard about Opportunity Zones through Hussle and wants to continue his work.

“We’re like the Avengers of investment,” he said. “It was an incredible loss … (Hussle’s death was) like losing Iron Man.”

Iron Man was the first member of the Avengers. He died after successfully taking down Thanos in the last installment of the franchise.

Hussle was shot and killed outside of his Los Angeles clothing store in March.

T.I. was comparing the two, as they both brought people together to make an impact in the community.

“Everybody knows that Nipsey was pretty much the founder of the idea to bring everyone together who, you know, may individually be able to do great things and make a significant impact on their own in their communities,” T.I. said. “But for us to come together, we can impact so, so many more communities and spread our efforts so much wider.”

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H/T Complex

Eilish O'Sullivan

Eilish O'Sullivan

Eilish O'Sullivan is an editorial intern for the Daily Dot studying journalism and government at the University of Texas at Austin. Her work has appeared in the Austin Chronicle and the Daily Texan.