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Technical consultant and web developer Dylan Curran shared some alarming findings about how much information Facebook and Google store from their users, and the findings included in a Twitter thread he wrote are enough to inspire readers to delete their Facebook, find a new email platform, and maybe even forego using G-Docs.

“Want to freak yourself out?” Curran asked on Twitter on March 24. The thread continues as a viral source of data-sharing panic for users. “I’m gonna show just how much of your information the likes of Facebook and Google store about you without you even realising it.”

Curran shared that Google has the capability to store its users’ location to create a timeline of where they travel, and stores users’ search history on a separate database that remains even if the search history is deleted. Curran’s thread goes into detail about the myriad of other ways Google tracks its users—and luckily, he includes links to everything so readers can quickly access their own Google accounts to turn off permissions for data collection.

Next Curran dove into the information databases Facebook keeps on its users—which is basically everything, including what stickers users send to their friends.

Curran also noted just how wild it is that internet users unknowingly allow corporations to have this much data about their lives.

“This is one of the craziest things about the modern age, we would never let the government or a corporation put cameras/microphones in our homes or location trackers on us, but we just went ahead and did it ourselves because fuck it I want to watch cute dog videos,” he wrote.

He also noted how dangerous this information can become when used incorrectly.

Curran’s thread has been retweeted over 160,000 times and liked by over 255,000 users.

In the wake of reports that political data firm Cambridge Analytica exploited the personal information of 50 million users, users have become more concerned than ever about how much data the social network collects on its users. Learn how to “poison” data before deleting Facebook and see what happens when users turn off Facebook’s ability to track their data. 

Tess Cagle

Tess Cagle

Tess Cagle is a reporter who focuses on politics, lifestyle, and streaming entertainment. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, Texas Monthly, the Austin American-Statesman, Damn Joan, and Community Impact Newspaper. She’s also a portrait, events, and live music photographer in Central Texas.