Sekiro cheating story inspires ‘you cheated not only the game’ meme

Over the last few decades, developer From Software has built a brand around its ridiculously difficult games. Its newest title, Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice, is no different. Each new release inevitably sparks a debate about the medium’s accessibility, but at least this time around, the internet got a new copypasta out of it.

A PC Gamer article detailing how the author beat Sekiro with cheats particularly ruffled gaming purists’ feathers last week. There were thousands of angry comments that eventually ran the author, James Davenport, off Twitter, but one quickly captured the internet’s attention.

“You cheated not only the game, but yourself,” begins what appears to be an earnestly upset comment left by Twitter user @Fetusberry. “You didn’t grow. You didn’t improve. You took a shortcut and gained nothing. You experienced a hollow victory. Nothing was risked and nothing was gained. It’s sad that you don’t know the difference.”

He later clarified on Twitter how his response was intentionally melodramatic. But the comment’s tone so perfectly captured the “git gud” argument among the gaming community’s less inclusive members that it quickly grew into a viral copypasta. In a twist of irony, the user later admitted he’d never played Sekiro in the first place.

https://twitter.com/ogecebel/status/1115993471506997250

https://twitter.com/JaysonsRage/status/1114719026176040960

Of course, gatekeeping is hardly unique to the gaming community, so the copypasta soon transformed into digs at just about everything under the sun, including the ridiculously long running time for Avengers: End Game.

Then came the in-game edits, with enthusiasts splicing the internet’s newest meme into classic favorites like Banjo Kazooie, Super Mario 64, and Earthbound. Cam Clarke, the voice actor for the Metal Gear Solid series’ character Liquid Snake, contributed an in-character iteration.

Given its track record, this likely won’t be the last time a From Software game stirs up vehement proponents both for and against increased accessibility in video games. At least this time, the internet’s not walking away from the fiery debate empty-handed.

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Alyse Stanley

Alyse Stanley

Alyse Stanley is a video game and culture reporter based in Virginia with words at Polygon and USGamer. When she’s not writing about memes, she edits Unwinnable’s monthly magazine. You can follow her on Twitter @pithyalyse.