Former Atlanta strip club barback details refilling top-shelf bottles with bottom-shelf liquor

@shawtywhatmakesyoutiktok/TikTok cdrin/ShutterStock (Licensed)

‘I’ve been slipped cheap liquor’: Server says he refilled bottles of Patron, Don Julio, Hennessy, and Grey Goose to trick customers

'People are so shady.'

 

Kahron Spearman

Trending

Posted on Mar 5, 2024

In a revelation gaining traction on TikTok, Shyne (@shawtywhatmakesyoutiktok) exposes a dubious practice at a popular Atlanta strip club where he worked as a barback. Garnering over 550,000 views, his 1:58-minute clip delves into the murky world of liquor substitution, where expensive top-shelf brands are replaced with bottom-shelf liquor, unbeknownst to patrons. This deceit questions the integrity of the nightlife industry and raises serious concerns about consumer trust and legal compliance.

Shyne begins his exposé with a candid confession, “I’m gonna start snitching in 3, 2, 1,” setting the tone for the shocking details. As the person responsible for managing the club’s liquor inventory, Shyne was instructed to refill bottles of high-end spirits like Patron, Don Julio, Hennessy, and Grey Goose with bottom-shelf liquor once they started running low. This practice, he reveals, was standard procedure as the night progressed, ensuring that the club could continue to charge premium prices for what was essentially $20 tequila in a $300 bottle.

The method described by Shyne for carrying out this scam was as meticulous as it was deceitful. Using a funnel to pour the bottom-shelf liquor into the emptied bottles of expensive brands, he resealed them with a plastic seal using a hairdryer, making the bottles appear unopened and authentic. To address discrepancies in the color of the liquor, he mixed in remnants of the original spirit to achieve a more convincing hue. This manipulation was facilitated by the dim lighting and the already inebriated state of the patrons, who were less likely to question the authenticity of their drinks.

“He ain’t lying; the entertainment business a menace,” said one commenter. Another person commented, “You ain’t lying! I can definitely tell when I’ve been slipped cheap liquor because it always makes me sick.”

“I believe you. People are so shady,” a person said.

“it’s illegal but he’s telling the truth y’all,” wrote another person.

This bait-and-switch tactic is not just a breach of ethical standards but also a violation of the law. Refilling liquor bottles contravenes Federal Law (26 U.S. Code § 5301, subsection c) and is illegal in all 50 U.S. states and countries regulating liquor sales globally. This practice is primarily opposed due to tax evasion concerns, as liquor is taxed per bottle or volume worldwide. Reusing bottles for liquor constitutes tax fraud, a significant legal issue rigorously enforced by authorities.

There are stories on TikTok and across social media with people admitting, or having witnessed, the practice.

As reported by thetakeout.com, such practices, while illegal, are not unheard of in the bar and nightclub scene. The implications are significant, affecting not just the consumers duped into paying top dollar for cheap liquor but also the state, which loses tax revenue from these fraudulent activities. Authorities take these matters seriously, and consumers who suspect such fraud are encouraged to report these establishments to a state’s liquor control commission.

@shawtywhatmakesyoutiktok

Incoming snitch shi..

♬ original sound – SHYNE

Shyne’s candid account shines a spotlight on the darker aspects of the nightlife industry, urging patrons to remain vigilant and skeptical of the authenticity of premium spirits served in bars and clubs. His advice to bring your own liquor to the club underscores the deep-seated mistrust that such practices foster among consumers. As the conversation around this issue grows, it’s clear that transparency and honesty are paramount to maintaining consumer trust and ensuring the integrity of the hospitality industry.

The Daily Dot contacted Shyne for comment.

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*First Published: Mar 5, 2024, 3:25 am CST