Trump’s Rose Garden podium sign is the perfect meme canvas

BTW

President Donald Trump had a sign tacked to the front of his podium during his unscheduled Rose Garden speech on Thursday, and it got the meme treatment on Twitter.

Trump was responding to claims that he engaged in a cover-up, doubling down the claim that the Mueller investigation found no obstruction and no collusion with the sign.

Twitter users quickly began to treat the sign as their own personal green screen of sorts. One person even gave the internet the gift of a blank sign to play with.

Others took the opportunity to poke fun at the president’s time spent golfing and his intelligence level.

Several people on Twitter “fixed” the sign with actual statistics regarding the Mueller investigation.

“Mueller investigation by the numbers,” Trump’s original sign read, along with some “statistics” about the investigation. Over 35 million spent, over 2,800 people were subpoenaed, and over 500 witnesses, the sign said. The investigation took 675 days, and Mueller’s team consisted of “18 angry Democrats.”

Trump held the speech after very briskly walking out of an infrastructure meeting with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.). The meeting lasted all of three minutes.

“We believe the president of the United States is engaged in a cover-up,” Pelosi told reporters before the meeting on Thursday.

Trump went straight from the meeting to the Rose Garden to publically refute the accusation. Many dubbed it a #TrumpTantrum, a hashtag that began trending shortly after the speech. Many also thought the pre-made, printed-out sign was a good indication that Trump’s speech was not as “impromptu” as claimed.

Schumer called Trump’s exit a “pre-planned excuse” with “prepared signs that (were) printed up long before” the meeting at a press conference.

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H/T Intelligencer 

Eilish O'Sullivan

Eilish O'Sullivan

Eilish O'Sullivan is an editorial intern for the Daily Dot studying journalism and government at the University of Texas at Austin. Her work has appeared in the Austin Chronicle and the Daily Texan.