Seth Abramson’s epic Mueller thread finally comes to a conclusion

Seth Abramson/Facebook

Twitter was taking bets how long this would go on.

Yesterday’s release of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s long-awaited report on Russian interference in the 2016 election was a Rorsarch text for the extremely online.

If you’ve long been touting that President Donald Trump is innocent of all charges, you saw complete exoneration. If you’ve felt the president obstructed justice—a charge worthy of impeachment—Robert Mueller presented a roadmap.

And if you’ve spent the past years convinced that an elaborate Kremlin-backed operation to install a Manchurian president inside the White House unfolded before our very eyes, well, the report did not show that. On that, we can all agree on.

Unless you’re Seth Abramson.

Abramson is a lawyer and professor who has long connected the dots between Trump and Russia, doing so in extended Twitter threads that go for days on end, stretching the fabric of spacetime, coming whenever some minuscule news about Mueller’s investigation dropped.

It’s become a running gag, but Abramson’s been able to profit off it, publishing a book, Proof of Collusion, that is literally a compendium of his Twitter threads.

So when Mueller’s report dropped, everyone awaited what Abramson would do. Would he admit that since the former director of the FBI didn’t reveal an entire spy operation out of Moscow, he was somewhat hyperbolic in his theories, doffing his cap and quietly fading away?

Or would he dig the fuck in?

Friends, you might want to buckle up.

It began at (1/) and people immediately wondered how high it could go.

And throughout the day, it kept growing, and growing, and growing. It went over 50. It went over 150. It went over 200.

Even data guru Nate Silver got in on analyzing its length.

And it became the stuff of memes.

Eventually, toward the end of the day, it hit the finish line, at tweet 451,

You might be wondering with an entire blog post being written about a Twitter thread, why you haven’t seen but a single one of the tweets from the thread.

Good question. It’s truly a testament to how off the wall, speculative, buried in minutiae, and just downright unnecessary the entire exercise is that you don’t need to read any of the 451. Not one.

But… fine. If you wanna get a sense of it, here you go.

Who is Gerson? Who is Dmitriev? I don’t know, and I cover this stuff for a living. While it’s likely there’s more to be revealed, with a dozen redacted referrals from Mueller’s investigation, speculating about whether Erik Prince is a CIA asset and repeatedly demanding he be indicted doesn’t serve any purpose.

Except for one.

Adding up all the tweets, Abramson wrote over 20,000 words yesterday about the Mueller report. Which is genuinely nuts. Unless you take the wisdom of one of my good friends, who messaged me about the thread yesterday.

“Well, next book isn’t going to write itself.”

Look for Collusion, PROVED in stores this summer.

David Covucci

David Covucci

David Covucci is the Layer 8 editor at the Daily Dot, covering the intersection of politics and the web. His work has appeared in Vice, the Huffington Post, Jezebel, Gothamist, and other publications. He is particularly interested in hearing any tips you have. Reach out at [email protected]