This candidate for Senate dropped a tremendously ill-advised poll about Robert E. Lee

Chris McDaniel, a Republican in Mississippi running for Congress, is learning that sometimes Twitter polls aren’t the best way to get an answer you want.

Especially if the answer you want is a warm embrace of the Confederacy.

McDaniel, apparently believing there was too much “political correctness” and “leftist hysteria” in the world, decided to ask his 12,300 followers on Twitter on Thursday how Robert E. Lee—the Confederate general at the heart of many Confederate statue debates—should be remembered.

It didn’t go over well.

With just a few hours remaining in his poll, 91 percent of people said Lee should be remembered as a “villain” to just 9 percent who said he should be remembered as a “hero.”

Chris McDaniel Robert E. Lee Twitter @senatormcdaniel/Twitter

If that wasn’t enough, the Robert E. Lee tweet was completely ratioed, generating more than 5,000 responses compared to just over 1,000 likes.

But like so many other people who have made bad posts on Twitter, McDaniel decided to tweet through it.

First, he retweeted someone who said it was “too bad” the liberals voting aren’t from Mississippi because “all they can do is moan and complain while we actually can vote you in, stay strong.”

Then, to cap it off he continued:

“One more quote, then I’ll move on to the next liberal outrage du jour. “We recognize Robert E. Lee was one of the greatest American Christians and one of our greatest American gentlemen.” – President Franklin D. Roosevelt,” McDaniel wrote.

Owning the libs with old quotes is the surest way to win an argument.

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Andrew Wyrich

Andrew Wyrich

Andrew Wyrich is a politics staff writer for the Daily Dot, covering the intersection of politics and the internet. Andrew has written for USA Today, NorthJersey.com, and other newspapers and websites. His work has been recognized by the Society of the Silurians, Investigative Reporters & Editors (IRE), and the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ).