Amazon’s ‘Handmade’ will battle Etsy for online craft dominance

amazon handmade

Amazon/Youtube

The battle of the handmade merchandise is on.

Amazon is now officially in the handmade crafts business. Today, the e-commerce giant launched Handmade, its own version of Etsy where DIY merchants can sell various items that are—you guessed it—made by hand.

Amazon shoppers can now dive into listings filed under categories such as Furniture, Jewelry, Home Décor, and Artwork, to name a few. There are already over 85,000 products listed that you can peruse and then later on, purchase. 

Since all items are essentially new, users won’t be able to rely on posted customer reviews just yet. Instead, you have the option to click on the seller’s profile to learn more about their work and message them any queries you might have prior to purchase.

How will Handmade fare against Etsy, the company that is arguably the Internet’s go-to spot for homespun wares? The latter has reportedly enjoyed a 2 billion-dollar growth in sales since 2005; Amazon’s own $75 billion in annual revenue is undeniably bigger in comparison, making it a worthy adversary in the battle for who can peddle both the cutest and kitschiest merchandise best.

Handcrafters—who can start showcasing their works on Handmade by applying for an invitation—can definitely benefit from Amazon’s steady and humongous base of consumers, which is reason enough for Etsy sellers to make the switch. Alternatively, as soon as Prime shipping becomes available for handmade items, they can also aid the company by converting artisanal aficionados into Amazon Prime subscribers (who might want their new coat rack made of real reindeer antlers, stat).

In the end, though, how Amazon intends to address complaints on exorbitant seller fees will determine their new venture’s initial success.

H/T New York Times | Screengrab via Amazon/Youtube

Jam Kotenko

Jam Kotenko

Jam Kotenko is a technology reporter and graphic designer who specializes in coverage of Instagram, Facebook, and other social media apps. Her work has been published by Digital Trends, Bustle, and Gotta Be Mobile.