‘The OA’ fans launch website devoted to showing ‘power’ of series

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The spirit of recently canceled Netflix series The OA is living on via its devoted fans.

Along with collaborative efforts to keep the show going—the movements, the flash mobs—there’s now a website devoted to collecting videos and photos from the viral #TheOAisReal hashtag. The OA star and co-creator Brit Marling referenced the site, TheOAisReal.com, in a lengthy Instagram post on Friday, stating: “Your words and images move us deeply. Not because the show must continue, but because for some people its unexpected cancelation begs larger questions about the tole of storytelling and its fate inside late capitalism’s push toward consolidation and economies of scale.”

https://www.instagram.com/p/B1hKgS9pUZG/

The site houses fan art, letters, testimonials, and videos of fans performing the Five Movements from the series. The About section states:

On this website, we are collecting a testament to this story’s power. Through The OA, we realized we weren’t crazy, alone, broken. We realized that science and spirituality could co-exist. Most of all, we realized that hope is not naïve. We may be living in a dimension crumbling to violence and pettiness and greed, but that doesn’t mean it can’t be repaired if we all work together.

In her post, Marling also acknowledged those protesting the show’s cancelation in the physical space, including one fan who is reportedly engaged in a hunger strike.

Of course, there are still theories that show isn’t really over, but Marling’s post seemed to suggest that it is, and that the “story keeps going” thanks to the fans.

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H/T Mashable

Audra Schroeder

Audra Schroeder

Audra Schroeder is the Daily Dot’s senior entertainment writer, and she focuses on streaming, comedy, and music. Her work has previously appeared in the Austin Chronicle, the Dallas Observer, NPR, ESPN, Bitch, and the Village Voice. She is based in Austin, Texas.