‘Stranger Things’ season 3 saw its highest viewer numbers yet

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Stranger Things season 3 was reportedly viewed in 64 million homes in the month of July, making it the most-viewed season of the series yet and adding some credence to its record-breaking first-week numbers.

Netflix revealed a few other third-quarter data points for recently released series and films on Wednesday, and some of them are encouraging. The series Unbelievable, which is based on the true story of a woman who was made to recant a rape allegation, was seen in 32 million households in its first month. High-school dramedy Tall Girl was viewed by 41 million; Ali Wong rom-com Always Be My Maybe by 32 million.

In the last year or so, Netflix has started sharing viewership numbers on Twitter; in January, it boasted huge numbers for its Lifetime pickup You, but without any context or data it was hard to see it as more than a PR push. The platform offered a little more context this time, revealing its most-watched original movies and series from October 2018 to September 2019. Sandra Bullock thriller Bird Box was apparently No. 1, viewed in 80 million households, followed by Adam Sandler-Jennifer Aniston whodunnit Murder Mystery (73 million). Stranger Things topped the series list, followed by The Umbrella Academy (45 million) and Money Heist (44 million), Netflix’s most-viewed show in non-English territories.

Netflix placed its bets on Stranger Things season 3 to boost its subscriber numbers, which appears to have happened, though the company fell just short of a projected 7 million new global subscribers. A price increase for U.S. subscribers earlier this year was held up as one reason for slower growth in the States. Perhaps the platform will be a bit more forthcoming about numbers once Apple TV+ and Disney+ go live next month.

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Audra Schroeder

Audra Schroeder

Audra Schroeder is the Daily Dot’s senior entertainment writer, and she focuses on streaming, comedy, and music. Her work has previously appeared in the Austin Chronicle, the Dallas Observer, NPR, ESPN, Bitch, and the Village Voice. She is based in Austin, Texas.