Space Force uniforms relentlessly mocked, memed

On Friday, the United States Space Force (USSF) shared the very first look at the Space Force uniforms.

“The first #SpaceForce utility uniform nametapes have touched down in the
Pentagon,” the Space Force tweeted, along with a photo of a Battle Dress Uniform (BDU) for a four-star general. The uniform is woodland-patterned camouflage, and the sleeve has both an American flag and a United States Space Command patch on it. The official uniform makes the Space Force the eighth uniformed service in the U.S.

 

Many are confused by the apparent uselessness of a woodland-patterned camouflage Space Force uniform and are suggesting that true camouflage for the Space Force would look, well, space-like.

“Shouldn’t space force camo be black with little stars on it?” Kyle Cassidy questioned.

Another Twitter user shared a photo of themselves in space cat leggings and said they were better dressed for the space force.

 

 

“You gonna be hiding behind a fucking space bush or something?” Twitter user @PostCultRev questioned.

People are so confused that the Space Force had to issue an explanation.

“USSF is utilizing current Army/Air Force uniforms, saving costs of designing/producing a new one. Members will look like their joint counterparts they’ll be working with, on the ground,” the Space Force wrote in response to one user who questioned, “Camo in space? WTF?”

Nevertheless, the uniforms are drawing a slew of comparisons to the battle on the fictional forest moon, Endor, which takes place in Return of the Jedi.

“People are mocking the Pentagon’s new camo Space Force uniforms as if the Battle of Endor never happened,” Twitter user @flimflamma wrote.

This is not the first time the Space Force has spawned memes, and it surely won’t be the last. People similarily memed the Space Force in 2018 when it was merely a proposal. As the Space Force begins to materialize, more memes likely will too.

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Eilish O'Sullivan

Eilish O'Sullivan

Eilish O’Sullivan is the news wire editor for the Daily Dot. Her work has appeared in the Austin Chronicle and the Daily Texan.