You are definitely non’t going to love this meme.

Last year, the word “whomst” took the internet by storm when online goofuses deduced that if “whom” is like the smart person form of “who,” then “whomst” must be for only the most brilliant of geniuses. It was only a matter of time before the word became a meme and took on a life of its own, and today’s latest language-bending example is no exception. Ladies and gentleman, I introduce you to: “Yesn’t.”

While the word actually dates back to a 2008 Urban Dictionary post that defines the word as meaning “maby yes and maby no,” [sic] yesn’t hit the internet again earlier this week when a petition was submitted to Change.org calling to change the word “No” in the English language to “Yesn’t.”

A screenshot of the petition then made its way to Reddit, where it received over 30,000 points within 24 hours and soon became a full-blown meme on the me irl subreddit. There’s now an entire r/yesnt subreddit.

Next, the Drake memes came flooding in.

As usual, the memes didn’t have to be particularly clever to be effective.

Some pointed out the potential real-world implications of playing God with the English language. Just because we can create new words, should we?

Eventually, things all came full circle.

And of course, by the order of natural progression, it was only a matter of time before “non’t” became a thing.

If there’s a line to be drawn, it’s got to be at no’nt’nt. Now my head just hurts.

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‘Whomst’ meme will make you a genius
It's simple: Who, whom, whomst, whomst'd.
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