MENUMENU

Trump tweeted ‘covfefe’ a year ago—and the internet is ablaze once more

Marc Nozell/Flickr (CC-BY)

Apparently, May 31 is now Covfefe Day.

One year ago, President Donald Trump sent out a cryptic tweet that sent the internet into a full-blown frenzy: “covfefe.”

The typo–which first showed up in a tweet from the president where he appeared to be complaining about coverage in the press–sparked countless memes, jokes, and sparked an effort among Trump’s most ardent supporters online to find out what “covfefe” really meant.

There was even a bill named after the typo.

Trump Covfefe Tweet Original Screenshot via @realDonaldTrump/Twitter

As the internet exploded in covfefe-filled madness, former White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer added fuel to the fire when he told reporters that “the president and a small group of people know exactly what he meant.”

Trump joined into the fray, goading Twitter to figure out what the word meant.

“Who can figure out the true meaning of “covfefe” ??? Enjoy!” the president wrote a year ago.

While it’s obvious that Trump made a typo–he’s made numerous ones on Twitter over the years–the mystery and aura of “covfefe” was a full-blown internet moment.

On Thursday morning, Trump (perhaps unintentionally) marked the anniversary of his typo while complaining about his press coverage by… complaining about press coverage.

“The corrupt Mainstream Media is working overtime not to mention the infiltration of people, Spies (Informants), into my campaign! Surveillance much?” he wrote.

Given the frenzy that occurred a year (perhaps a lifetime?) ago, people online decided to celebrate the anniversary on Thursday—with many people referring to it as “Covfefe Day.”

Maybe next year on May 31, Trump will make another typo.

READ MORE: 

Andrew Wyrich

Andrew Wyrich

Andrew Wyrich is a politics staff writer for the Daily Dot, covering the intersection of politics and the internet. Andrew has written for USA Today, NorthJersey.com, and other newspapers and websites. His work has been recognized by the Society of the Silurians, Investigative Reporters & Editors (IRE), and the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ).