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How to enable Flash in Google Chrome

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You only have until 2020 before Adobe ends support for Flash.

Flash is on its way out. Adobe announced in July 2017 that it would stop supporting the previously ubiquitous plug-in in 2020. That’s because Flash use is dramatically decreasing, with Google reporting only 17 percent of Chrome users visit a site with Flash each day. That number is down from 80 percent three years ago. Google’s Chrome browser automatically turns off Flash by default, but someday you may need it. You should know how to enable Flash in Chrome when that situation comes up.

How to enable Flash in Chrome

Step 1: Go to Content Settings

Rather than being forced to navigate through menus, the easiest way to access Chrome settings is via the address bar. Enter chrome://settings/content into the address bar and press enter.

How to enable Flash in Chrome - content settings Screengrab via Chrome

Step 2: Scroll to the Flash tab

Towards the bottom of the Content Settings menu, under JavaScript, you will locate the Flash tab. Select it.

How to enable Flash in Chrome - flash pannel chrome Screengrab via Chrome

Step 3: Turn off “Block sites from running Flash.”

Once you turn off the “Block sites from Running Flash” button, you’ll notice the feature is now set to “Ask first.” From this point on, when you encounter a Flash plug-in, you’ll be asked if you want to activate it for that particular site.

How to enable Flash in Chrome Screengrab via Chrome

How to active a Flash plug-in in Chrome

Step 1: Go to a site that requires Flash

For old time’s sake, let’s use Newgrounds, the legendary Flash-based game site that birthed titles like Alien Hominid and N+. We’re loading Duke Dashington Remastered for this example.

how to enable flash in chrome - newgrounds flash game Screengrab via Newgrounds

Step 2: Find the grey box marked “Click to enable Flash Player.”

When you encounter a site that uses Flash, from this point on you’ll see a notice a blank grey box with “Click to enable Adobe Flash Player” and the outline of a puzzle piece. That’s where your Flash plug-in is located.

how to enable enable flash in chrome Screengrab via Newgrounds

Step 3: Click the button and then confirm again in the pop-up

When you select “Click to enable Adobe Flash Player,” a pop-up will appear at the top of the screen. Select the “Allow” button. This will reload your current page.

how to enable flash in chrome Screengrab via Newgrounds

Step 4: Enjoy your content.

You only have to allow Flash once per page, so the next time you visit Newgrounds, even if you play a different game, you’re all set. Remember when visiting a site you’re not familiar with to regularly run a virus check on your computer to make sure you don’t accidentally pick up any bugs along the way.

how to play flash game chrome Screengrab via Newgrounds

How to check what sites have Flash enabled in Chrome

If you’re curious about which sites you’ve enabled Flash on, there’s an easy way to tell via the Content/Flash menus. Go to chrome://settings/content/flash and scroll to the bottom. You’ll see a list of each site you’ve enabled Flash on.

how to check if flash is enabled on chrome Screengrab via Chrome

The death of Adobe Flash is bittersweet. It’s true the plug-in is long past its usefulness, especially in the face of more secure platforms like HTML5. But Flash, for all its faults, provided a foundation for countless web pioneers to express themselves. While plenty of sites will update in the future to bring their projects to the new standards, countless others will be lost to time and obsolescence. You have until 2020 to enjoy them all. .

John-Michael Bond

John-Michael Bond

John-Michael Bond is a tech reporter and culture writer for Daily Dot. A longtime cord-cutter and early adapter, he's an expert on streaming services (Hulu with Live TV), devices (Roku, Amazon Fire), and anime. A former staff writer for TUAW, he's knowledgeable on all things Apple and Android. You can also also find him regularly performing standup comedy in Los Angeles.