The latest Minecraft meme is frickin’ hilarious

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Server operators on online multiplayer games can set up restrictions and ban certain behavior. Servers geared for young children are particularly restrictive. And then there’s Christian servers, which promote a family-friendly environment. That usually includes a swear filter.

Recent memes shared across Reddit and other social channels mock the warnings that players receive on these types of servers. The memes often include the phrase, “This is a Christian server so no swearing.” Other memes joke about server moderators giving warnings for words like “heck” and “frick,” which most people wouldn’t consider curse words.

Many of the memes originated from server warnings on the popular building game Minecraft. Don’t confuse it for the “please do not swear on my profile” meme that took off on Facebook earlier this year—that meme was rooted in a Photoshopped Family Guy image. But both memes similarly roast people who put up “no swearing” notices in an online setting.

https://www.reddit.com/r/dankmemes/comments/6xzmry/lifetime_n/

NO SWEARIN ON MY PROFILE from dankmemes

r/madlads from dankmemes

Is this a good investment? from MemeEconomy

me.me

The most alarming version of this meme includes an illustration of a super buff Winnie the Pooh, turning the child-friendly character into an intimidating figure.

No swearing from dankmemes

The fact that moderators might use words and images like the one above to curb harassment in a multiplayer game is of course laughable.

This version of the meme satirizes the original Winnie the Pooh meme:

me.me

We don’t know if this meme will reach beyond the niche community of Minecraft players, but it keeps popping up around the internet. And now Taylor Swift is a part of it.

Internet, look what you made this meme do!

Tiffany Kelly

Tiffany Kelly

Tiffany Kelly is the Unclick editor at Daily Dot. Previously, she worked at Ars Technica and Wired. Her writing has appeared in several other print and online publications, including the Los Angeles Times, Popular Mechanics, and GQ.