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Heinz tries introducing a ketchup and mayonnaise sauce—and instead launches a Twitter war

Ketchup and mayonnaise have been together for a long time now.

 

David Britton

Internet Culture

Published Apr 13, 2018   Updated May 21, 2021, 6:39 pm CDT

Mixing ketchup and mayonnaise, a concoction some people call “fry sauce” or occasionally “fancy sauce,” is nothing new. When both condiments are sitting in front of you, it’s not that much of a leap to add them to the same container. People have been doing that for a long, long time.

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So it is not surprising that when Heinz recently starting promoting “Mayochup,” everyone wanted the brand to know it hadn’t stumbled across anything new.

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According to a report by Insider, the Heinz version of the sauce is currently only available in Kuwait, but they are debating whether or not to bring it to the United States, hence the Twitter poll. It’s a move that sparked more controversy than the brand probably anticipated.

To be fair, Heinz did make “Nah, I’ll make my own” one of the options, implying they knew they were not the first to think of the idea, but that didn’t stop people from taking them to task.

https://twitter.com/Kalyx_Alanna/status/984481598715252736

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https://twitter.com/Zcausley/status/984528317310267394

Some people feel strongly that it was invented in Utah, where you can actually buy a name brand version called “Some Dude’s Fry Sauce.”

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Eater seemed to agree with these people. An article from 2016 states the mixture was invented in the 1940s by a Salt Lake City man named Don Carlos Edwards.  It’s quite possible the Edwards did coin the name “Fry Sauce,” but was he the first person to mix mayonnaise with ketchup? Doubtful.

A lot of people seemed pretty convinced it has Latin American roots.

https://twitter.com/oriana_swift13/status/984419834061615105

https://twitter.com/yasiel72/status/984204848139849734

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Others said it was Russian dressing.

Russian dressing’s base is, in fact, ketchup and mayonnaise, but it also contains additional herbs and spices. So sorry to fans of that particular condiment, but your argument is hereby thrown out on a technicality.

Heinz tried to smooth over the debate by finding some common ground.

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But people weren’t buying it.

Which lead to even more debate about the sauce’s origins and prevalence.

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Heinz even tried getting a little saucy with some of its customers.

The company might have set off a larger debate then they intended, but at the very least they were able to make one guy happy.

It’s also not as if the company is even leading the “put two things people use together in the same container” revolution. Smucker’s “Goober,” which is peanut butter and jelly in the same jar, has been around forever.

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And although it, unfortunately (fortunately?) was never a real product, Mr. Show’s Mustmayostardayonnaise was introduced over twenty years ago.

Ketchup and mayonnaise were probably mixed together the first time they showed up in the same room at the same time. If the two ingredients can get along so well, maybe we can too.

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*First Published: Apr 13, 2018, 6:10 pm CDT