This Twitter meme is—and I cannot stress this enough—good

Sometimes, there really is no such thing as too much dramatic emphasis.

Enter the internet’s latest hot meme: ‘and I cannot stress this enough.’ It started blowing up in August when Twitter users began ‘stressing’ the importance of everything from social justice to celebrity crushes. About one week into September, the meme really gained traction across all of Twitter. Now, it’s raising the stakes for long-running Twitter jokes, movie quotes, and even famous lines in literature.

‘And I Cannot Stress This Enough’ memes

For example, Twitter user @kaytaylorrea is simply overcome by the sheer power of this picture of Taika Waititi and Jon Hamm.

Speaking of power, Hozier’s magnetic stage presence is definitely worth emphasizing.

This Monsta X fan really needs the world to understand the vocal prowess of Yoo Kihyun.

Twitter user @jxhnwicks just wants to shield Keanu Reeves from this ugly, harsh world. And honestly, who doesn’t?

Some folks on Twitter are taking advantage of the meme to make some commentary on their favorite movies and shows.

There are quite a few yee yee community tie-ins, as well.

Over time, the meme evolved to poke fun of well-known book quotes.

Everyone loves a good Pride and Prejudice callback.

Truly, Homer wishes he could’ve written this line.

The versatility of this book meme format really is limitless.

This book trend naturally turned into a playful mockery of lines from beloved films.

Even Elijah Wood, known for playing Frodo in the Lord of the Rings films, got in on the fun. Who knew he was a Star Wars fans?

Meanwhile, political Twitter has been having a ball.

Lastly, of course, comes Horny Twitter’s contributions.

After all, it can hardly be called a meme unless—and I cannot stress this enough—people are using it to be horny on main.

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Anna Maria Ward

Anna Maria Ward

Anna Maria Ward is the social media editor of the Daily Dot. Her work focuses on the intersections of entertainment, pop culture, and social justice. She previously contributed to the Houston Chronicle and Orange magazine.