Man talking(l+r), Plant on table(c)

Di Studio/Shutterstock @themediterraneangardener/Tiktok (Licensed)

‘Wait, no snake plant?’: Expert reveals the 3 best oxygen-releasing plants for the bedroom

‘This low-maintenance plant adds elegance to any room.’

 

Phil West

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An expert on plants weighed in on the best oxygen-releasing plants for the bedroom based on their ability to release oxygen during the night as well as during the day.

The video showing this comes from Michael Griffiths, who creates content under the pseudonym The Mediterranean Gardener (@themediterraneangardener). It went up on TikTok on Jan. 26 and has since received 2.9 million views.

He starts by pointing out, “Did you know some plants release oxygen into the night, making them perfect to have in your bedroom? We all know that plants take in carbon dioxide and give us oxygen throughout the day, but at night, photosynthesis stops, and only carbon dioxide diffuses out. But here are three house plants that continue to release oxygen at night due to their crassulacean acid metabolism.”

A Britannica article on the subject notes it’s an “alternative photosynthetic pathway” in which plants “keep their leaf stomata closed during the day to reduce water loss. These plants do release some oxygen at night when the stomata open and the oxygen can escape.”

Griffiths lists three plants that do the trick while looking good in the bedroom. “Number one is the peace lily, or spathiphyllum, one of the best air-purifying plants with smooth leaves and brilliant wildflowers. This low-maintenance plant adds elegance to any room.”

Number two on his list is the areca palm, aka the golden palm, butterfly palm, or yellow palm. He notes, “With incredible jungle-like stems, this beautiful plant prefers indirect sunlight and a light mist a few times a week.”

Though the first two might be unfamiliar, number three on his list is a well-known flower—the orchid.

@themediterraneangardener Perfect plants for the bedroom Did you know that some plants continue to release oxygen into the night making them perfect to have in your bedroom! We all know that plants take in carbon dioxide and give us oxygen through the day but at night, photosynthesis stops and only carbon dioxide diffuses out. The peace lily or Spathiphyllum is one of the best air purifying plants even earning a place amongst NASA’s clean air studies With smooth leaves and brilliant white flower, this low maintenance plant adds elegance to any room. It is not a CAM plant but a great addition. Areca palm, also known as the golden palm, butterfly palm and yellow palm. With Incredible jungle like stems this beautiful plant prefers indirect sunlight and a light mist a few times a week Phalaenopsis or the orchid – this beautiful flowering plant will oxygenate the air in your room at night #garden #gardening #gardentok #gardenideas ♬ original sound – Michael – Gardening tips

Commenters pointed out he had one notable omission.

One simply asked, “Wait, no snake plant?” That led a number of snake plant stans to jump in.

Another questioned his assessment of the peace lily as a “low-maintenance plant.”

“My peace lily is literally the most temperamental and dramatic thing I’ve ever owned,” that person remarked. “Don’t understand how people say they’re so easy to care for!”

“I have one from my grandma’s funeral,” another said. “It’s going on 2 years now, and it’s the most stubborn, dramatic thing ever. I wish I could leave it and forget.”

Another questioned the premise, saying, “As nice as this is, the science says a house literally full of plants still wouldn’t produce enough oxygen to make a difference.”

For those who want to try anyway, Nursery Live provides a full list of 10 plants, including the three the Griffiths mentioned, as well as the Christmas cactus, the gerbera flower, the tulsi or holy basil, and aloe vera. And yes, the snake plant also made that list.

The Daily Dot has reached out to Griffiths via Instagram direct message.

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