MENUMENU

Every company cutting ties with the NRA

Gage Skidmore/Flickr (CC-BY-SA)

Over 20 companies have ended their relationship with the National Rifle Association.

In the wake of the Parkland shooting that left 17 high school students dead—and in response to nationwide protests against gun violence and the National Rifle Association’s grip on Congress—numerous companies have come forward in solidarity with gun control advocates.

More than 20 companies have announced they plan to end their partnerships with the NRA, and on Wednesday, Walmart and Dick’s Sporting Goods became the latest to raise their minimum age for gun buyers to 21. REI also joined the protest, by ending its relationship with Vista Outdoors, on Friday.

Of course, there are still numerous companies with ties to the NRA that have been silent, including FedEx. Celebrities have been calling for a boycott of Amazon until it ends NRAtv.

The NRA remains unphased—at least on social media—and it tweeted that the loss of discounts and partnerships would not sway their members.

Let it be absolutely clear,” the NRA tweeted. “The loss of a discount will neither scare nor distract one single NRA member from our mission to stand and defend the individual freedoms that have always made America the greatest nation in the world.”

Still, companies continue to issue statements that say they’ve decided to distance themselves from the NRA. Here’s a list of companies who’ve shown support for gun control or have policy changes to protest the NRA. 

First National Bank: The first company to issue a statement, First National Bank said on Feb. 22 that it will not renew its contract with the NRA to issue the NRA VISA card.

Enterprise Holdings Inc.: The parent company of rental car company Enterprise, which also owns Alamo and National, said on Feb. 22 that all three brands had ended discount specials with NRA members, beginning March 26.

Best Western: The hotel company said on Feb. 22 that it is no longer a corporate sponsor of the NRA.

Allied Van Lines and North American Van Lines: The parent company of the two moving van companies said on Feb. 23 it plans to end its discount services for NRA members.

Wyndham Hotels: The hotel company said on Feb. 23 that it’s no longer affiliated with the NRA.

TrueCar: The car buying company said on Feb. 23 that its relationship with the NRA would be over as of Feb. 28.  

Avis Budget Group: The parent company of car rental companies Avis and Budget said on Feb. 23 it planned to end its 25 percent off base rate special previously offered to NRA members.

Hertz: The car rental company said on Feb. 23 it plans to end its discount rates offered to NRA members.

MetLife: The insurance company said on Feb. 23 it decided to end its discount program for NRA members.

Chubb Ltd.: The insurance company said on Feb. 23 it would stop underwriting a National Rifle Association-branded insurance policy for gun owners.

Symantec: The software company said on Feb. 23 it ended its discount program with the NRA.

SimpliSafe: The home security company said on Feb. 23 it ended a partnership with the NRA, which offered its members two months of free monitoring with a purchase of any new home security system.

Personify Corp.: The parent organization of Wild Apricot, a software company, said on Feb. 23 it asked the NRA to remove its listed support from its website. Personify Corp. said it never had a formal partnership with the NRA, and the association was using its artwork on the NRA website without permission.

Delta: The airline said on Feb. 24 it plans to end its contract with the NRA, which gave discounted rates for group travel to NRA members.

United Airlines: The airline said on Feb. 24 it plans to end its contract with the NRA, which gave discounted rates for group travel to NRA members.

Starkey Hearing Technologies: The hearing aid company said on Feb. 24 it decided not to renew its discount program with the NRA.

Paramount RX: The prescription network said on Feb. 24 it was working with a third-party partner to end its discount program with the NRA.

Lockton Affinity: The insurance company that sells the NRA Carry Guard program for gun owners, said on Feb. 26 it will discontinue the terms of its contract with the NRA.

Republic Bank: The banking company said on Feb. 26 it will no longer offer NRA Visa prepaid credit cards.

Securian Financial Group: The mutual holding company said on Feb. 26 it would not market various insurance policies to NRA members.

Walmart: The retail corporation, which is also the biggest gun seller, said on Feb. 28 that it would not sell any gun to anyone under 21 years of age. It also said it would no longer sell items resembling assault-style rifles, including toys and air guns.

Dick’s Sporting Goods: The retail corporation said on Feb. 28 it was immediately ending sales of all assault-style rifles in its stores. The retailer also said that it would no longer sell high-capacity magazines and would also require any gun buyer to be at least 21, regardless of local laws. Dick’s encouraged legislators to enact “common sense” gun reform, as well.

REI: The outdoor retailer said on March 1 it would halt orders of products from Vista Outdoors, whose brands include CamelBak, Bell, and Giro, because of its close ties with the NRA. The decision was made after 18,000 customers signed an online petition.

Mountain Equipment Co-Op: The outdoor retailer said on March 1 it would also halt orders of products from Vista Outdoors.

Bumble: The dating app announced on March 5 that it will be banning pictures of guns from users’ profiles as well as donating $100,000 toward the student-led March for Our Lives protest on March 24.

 

Editor’s note: This article is regularly updated for relevance.

Tess Cagle

Tess Cagle

Tess Cagle is a reporter who focuses on politics, lifestyle, and streaming entertainment. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, Texas Monthly, the Austin American-Statesman, Damn Joan, and Community Impact Newspaper. She’s also a portrait, events, and live music photographer in Central Texas.