popedream
A young Spaniard named Alejandro Rodriguez predicted Benedict's resignation and Francis's election in a dream. And there's proof on Twitter. 

A young man in Spain predicted Benedict's resignation and Francis's election in a dream. And there's proof on Twitter. 

On the morning of Feb. 11, the girlfriend of 22-year-old Madrid resident Alejandro Rodriguez sent a tweet about her partner's dream:

In English, through the power of Google Translate, that reads:

Yolanda De Mena sent that tweet at 6:06am ET, just as news was breaking of Benedict's resignation from the papacy. It is the other fact, Rodriguez's premonition of the new pope's name, which struck a chord with Twitter users.

De Mena's tweet, which one person dubbed "the biggest spoiler in the history of mankind" has been retweeted more than 58,000 times, with her boyfriend surprised to see it receiving attention from outlets in Chile, Colombia, and Spain. He was also interviewed by an Argentine radio show. Meanwhile, De Mena's follower count has jumped from around 100 to more than 9,400.

While some suggested that De Mena had somehow faked the date on the tweet, it's there as clear as day. Of course, she could have been fibbing about the Benedict part of the dream given the time it was posted, but there's no way to have altered the tweet to add Francis's name. It was either a lucky guess, or a prophetic dream about the new pope.

Photo via @Ardecabo/Twitter

Promoted Stories Powered by Sharethrough
Society
Facebook shocked that a woman runs I F*cking Love Science
When the owner of the most popular science page on Facebook revealed her identity the other day, the reaction was sadly predictable. "OMG GIRL," came the crescendo of comments from dumbfounded men (and a few women). It was as if Elise Andrew had infiltrated a 19th century scientific conference and suddenly ripped off a fake mustache in front of the assembled muttering menfolk. Cue pipes falling from open mouths. Shock! Awe! A woman!
pope francis
4 Twitter lessons Pope Francis can learn from the Dalai Lama
Let's face it: Pope Benedict XVI wasn't very good at Twitter. Oh sure, he had more than 1 million followers on his English account, @Pontifex, but that's easily achievable if you're the head of a religion with more than 1 billion devotees. His tweets were usually boring missives like "What does Sunday, the day of the Lord, mean for us? It is a day for rest and for family, but first of all a day for Him." Nothing exactly groundbreaking.
The Latest From Daily Dot Video
Group

Pure, uncut internet. Straight to your inbox.

Thanks for subscribing to our newsletter!