Scott Walker doesn’t know how to use a Venn diagram

@GovWalker/Twitter

BTW

Scott Walker, the recently defeated Republican governor of Wisconsin, has been under fire for trying to limit the powers of his successor, Democrat Tony Evers. He’s also catching heat for having no clue how a Venn diagram works.

Walker signed a series of bills on Friday cementing the changes to the governor’s power, including one limiting the governor’s role in rule-making, and giving power over an economic development board to legislators instead of Evers. The new laws also limit the power of the incoming attorney general Josh Kaul, restrict early voting, and prevent Evers and Kaul for withdrawing from a lawsuit against the Affordable Care Act.

Walker tried to downplay the effects of these and other bills that he signed at a ceremony in Green Bay on Friday.

Armed with a huge poster with the offending diagram, Walker called the outcry over the legislative changes “hype and hysteria.”

The poster in question shows two circles side by side, which overlap a bit in the middle, much like an actual Venn diagram. But within each distinct circle, the same text describing the powers of the governor appears. The area where the two circles overlap, which should include a listing of the powers that remain the same from administration to administration, simply says, “BOTH ADMINISTRATIONS, SAME POWERS.”

Walker claimed in a tweet that even with the new bills, the governor of Wisconsin will still be “one of the most powerful chief executives in the country.”

While Twitter users were angry about Walker’s attempts to limit the power of incoming Democrats, they managed to find the time to make fun of his Venn diagram faux pas, too.

Walker is notorious for having gutted Wisconsin teachers’ unions in 2011. In this year’s elections, though, he called himself the “pro-education governor,” a title that, in light of the Venn diagram gaffe, seems unearned.

H/T BuzzFeed

Ellen Ioanes

Ellen Ioanes

Ellen Ioanes is the FOIA reporter at the Daily Dot, where she covers U.S. politics. She is a graduate of Columbia Journalism School, and her work has appeared in the Guardian, the Center for Public Integrity, HuffPost India, and more.