Reporter’s dumb question about ‘Gravity’ was staged

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The “reporter” is Carlos Perez, a correspondent for a comedic Spanish-language talk show.

A reporter for a Spanish-language outlet asked Alfonso Cuaron what everyone who’s seen his new sci-fi thriller Gravity wants to know: What was it like to film in space?

A reporter from Mexico’s TV Azteca asked the director, “What were the technical and human difficulties of filming in space? … Was it very difficult, very complicated to film in space? Did the camera operators get sick?”

In a YouTube video of the event, Cuaron laughs and scratches his head. But then he answers the question with a straight face. 

He tells the reporter that they took two cameras up to the Soyuz, that they were in space for three and a half months, and that he got very sick during filming. The audience cracks up.

The video is going viral, accumulating more than 92,000 views after being posted just yesterday. But like most super-popular Internet videos these days, the scenario was staged. The “reporter” is Carlos Perez, a correspondent for a comedic talk show called Deberían Estar Trabajando (or in English, You Should Be Working). There’s some debate though about whether it was actually a joke question. 

On Twitter, Perez wrote, “Excuse me Twitter for being a professional committed to information. Don’t tell me I was the only one who had that doubt.” 

He’s being sarcastic (hopefully), though some on Twitter and YouTube have come to Perez’s defense saying it’s a credit to Cuaron’s filmmaking skills that someone actually thought the movie was shot in space. 

H/T Gawker | Photo via Warner Bros.

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