Wonder Woman soars at the box office, shattering records and stereotypes

BTW

Amid tremendous anticipation, Wonder Woman’s first weekend at the box office went over about as well as it possibly could have. So far, it’s reportedly hauled in a whopping $100 million in U.S. ticket sales alone, and another $122 million internationally, making it the most successful and biggest-ever film release with a woman in the director’s chair.

Patty Jenkins is at the helm of the film, and it’s the first Warner Bros. superhero movie to explicitly have a woman, Gal Gadot as the eponymous Wonder Woman, in its starring role.

According to the Hollywood Reporter, the film also saw massive success at drawing women out to the theater, comprising a full 52 percent of its viewers, as compared to the average, where men make up 60 percent of ticket buyers for superhero movies. In other words, it’s been a big win for women’s representation in the director’s chair, on the marquee, and in the movie theater.

This won’t come as any shock to advocates for increased representation of women in Hollywood, especially in traditionally male-centric genres like comic book and superhero films. Such advocates have argued for years that a well-written, well-acted superhero movie geared toward women could find mainstream and even mega-hit success, despite reluctance on the part of major Hollywood studios to depart from the typically male-centric approach that has historically been upheld in the genre.

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It looks like Wonder Woman is going to shatter some of those longstanding stereotypes. The film cost nearly $150 million to produce, and it’s already earned back more than that (when you include international box office figures). It’s on pace to massively out earn its budget, a big win for Warner Bros. and for everyone involved with the project.

Chris Tognotti

Chris Tognotti

Chris Tognotti is a frequent contributor for the Daily Dot. He’s a news and current events writer based out of Berkeley, California, and a co-host of the podcast Now We Know. While he specializes in domestic politics and opinion writing, he’s also savvy on sports, video games, and film.