whats will all the celebrity merch

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‘I’ve been looking everywhere for the Ellen Degeneres lemon squeezer’: Ross shopper finds aisle of bizarre celebrity-branded items

‘I need all the Ed Hardy things.’

 

Jack Alban

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The graveyard of celebrity-branded products is at Ross Dress for Less, according to TikToker Ryan Dandelion (@ryandandelion).

The Tiktoker recorded himself ambling through the aisles of a Ross location to show off some bizarre choices celebrities’ have made in lending their name and likeness to promote certain products—everything from Ellen Degeneres pet toiletry items to Ed Hardy razors and nail clippers. In fact, there were a lot of Mario Lopez and Ellen Degeneres branded items that many users on the application found to be quite bizarre.

@ryandandelion #ross ♬ original sound – ryan dandelion

Ryan begins his clip by entering a Ross Dress for Less location and immediately begins looking at some of the offerings inside the establishment.

“Why is this covered in cat hair?” he says after looking at a sweater. Shortly after, he’s standing in front of another shelf at the store, “Who wants some Juicy Couture hand sanitizer?” He holds up a pink bottle showing off the product, begging the question, why would anyone specifically want to sanitize their hands with something manufactured by a company known for making velour jumpsuits?

Next up was a duo of products that also featured similarly out-of-the-box celebrity endorsements: doggy training pads brought you to by Ellen Degeneres and Mario Lopez.

“What about some Ellen Degeneres doggy pee pee pads?” the creator says. “Ellen Degeneres doggy pee pee poo poo pad? Oh, what about some Mario Lopez doggy pee pee poo poo pads?”

He then shows off a package containing white and pink Ed Hardy razors, followed by a slew of kitchen items featuring, again, Mario Lopez and Ellen Degeneres.

“What about a Mario Lopez can opener? What about a Mario Lopez spoon? What about some Ellen Degeneres bag clips? Ellen Degeneres lemon squeezer?” Ryan then more carefully inspects the lemon squeezer, expressing an interest in actually purchasing it. When he turns it around, he reveals the word “love” written in cursive on the back handle of the squeezer. “Ellen Degeneres can opener?”

The TikToker then transitions to a clothing rack again, saying that he “really need[s] a black sweater,” before turning it around to reveal that the front graphic of the item sports a still from the original Lion King movie, which shows Scar woefully expressing that he’s “surrounded by idiots.”

But then it’s back to more strangely branded items, like some Ed Hardy nail clippers and an Ed Hardy loofah.

It turns out that several other commenters have had their fair share of run-ins with branded products that seemingly don’t make any sense.

“My parents bought Jersey Shore dog leash and I think about it weekly,” one person remarked.

“I was at tj maxx and they had a cool rancho dorito eyeshadow pallet,” someone else said.

“I got a Tamera Mowry garlic press from there lol,” one user wrote, suggesting that Ross receives several random celeb-endorsed items.

Paris Hilton fans would be happy to know that they might be able to purchase cooking items featuring her likeness on the packaging as well, with a user writing, “I got a Paris Hilton cookie sheet there last week.”

Another joked, “If I was friends w a celeb I would mail them their Ross merchandise periodically.”

“Omg i’ve been looking everywhere for the ellen degeneres lemon squeezer,” another quipped.

Weird celebrity endorsements are nothing new. Before the internet became a widely accessible service for mass consumption, it wouldn’t be uncommon for actors to travel overseas to star in regional commercials that probably paid a ton of money to put them in bizarre commercials. The trend of off-kilter brand deals continues: like Zendaya repping Squarespace, or Ed Sheeran partnering with Heinz.

The Daily Dot has reached out to Ross Dress for Less and Ryan via email for further comment.

 
The Daily Dot