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California is the third state to propose its own net neutrality rules after the FCC’s vote.

California’s state Senate joined a host of other states by approving a bill that would create net neutrality rules after the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted to rescind similar rules nationwide late last year.

While the FCC’s repeal of net neutrality rules prevented states from creating their own, California joined New York and Montana who are forging ahead and crafting laws in light of the agency’s controversial vote, Ars Technica reports.

Pushback against the FCC’s decision to end net neutrality, which ensures that all internet traffic be treated equally, is not coming just in the forms of laws–21 states and the District of Columbia have sued the FCC following its vote.

California’s bill was passed 21 to 12. The bill blocks internet service providers (ISPs) from: blocking lawful content, using “paid prioritization” or enhancing internet access for customers who pay more money, or engaging in misleading marketing practices, among other things.

“It is the intent of this act to ensure that corporations do not impede competition or engage in deceptive consumer practices, and that they offer service to residential broadband internet customers on a nondiscriminatory basis,” the bill reads.

The bill now goes to the State Assembly, where Democrats have an overwhelming majority.

Last week New York became the second state to fight back against net neutrality rules when Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed an executive order that requires state officials to honor net neutrality principles.  The order also requires internet service providers (ISPs) with state contracts to adhere to the rules.

New York followed Montana, who last week became the first state to sign an executive order protecting net neutrality within its state.

“There has been a lot of talk around the country about how to respond to the recent decision by the Federal Communications Commission to repeal net neutrality rules, which keep the internet free and open. It’s time to actually do something about it,” Montana Gov. Steve Bullock said in a statement. “This is a simple step states can take to preserve and protect net neutrality. We can’t wait for folks in Washington, D.C., to come to their senses and reinstate these rules.”

You can read more about California’s bill here.

Andrew Wyrich

Andrew Wyrich

Andrew Wyrich is a politics staff writer for the Daily Dot, covering the intersection of politics and the internet. Andrew has written for USA Today, NorthJersey.com, and other newspapers and websites. His work has been recognized by the Society of the Silurians, Investigative Reporters & Editors (IRE), and the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ).