Halsey accidentally called for another 9/11

Halsey apologized on Thursday after she accidentally called for the collapse of the One World Trade Center in New York City.

Pitchfork tweeted out its review of Halsey’s recently released album, Manic, with the caption, “Too much of this album sounds like the amorphous pop that you might associate with a miserable Lyft ride.”

Manic is Halsey’s third studio album, which was released on Jan. 17. Pitchfork’s Rawiya Kameir gave the album a 6.5 rating.

“Can the basement that they run p*tchfork out of just collapse already,” Halsey tweeted in response. The tweet has since been deleted.

After the World Trade Center collapsed in the 9/11 attacks, it was rebuilt as the One World Trade Center. The Pitchfork office is located at the One World Trade Center, a fact that NBC News reporter Ben Kesslen pointed out on Twitter.

“Losing my mind thinking about the person on Halsey’s team who had to tell her she just called for the collapse of One World Trade,” Kesslen tweeted.

In response to Kesslen’s tweet, Halsey noted that she did not realize where exactly the Pitchfork office was located when she posted the tweet.

“ABSOLUTELY deleted it upon realizing this. Was just trying to make a joke! Intended zero harm,” Halsey wrote in another since-deleted tweet. “Just figured I could poke at them back with the same aloof passive aggression they poke at artists with! Clearly a misunderstanding.”

Halsey is the latest musician to take aim at a publication or writer (specifically Pitchfork and Kameir) for penning a less-than-glowing review. In 2019, after Kameir called Lizzo‘s Cuz I Love You out for its commercial appeal, Lizzo argued that only musicians should be allowed to review albums. After NPR’s Ann Powers penned a review of Norman Fucking Rockwell! that was described as “nuanced criticism” by fellow music writers, Lana Del Rey slammed Powers on Twitter.

READ MORE: 

Eilish O'Sullivan

Eilish O'Sullivan

Eilish O’Sullivan is the news wire editor for the Daily Dot. Her work has appeared in the Austin Chronicle and the Daily Texan.