The U.S. State Department just negged everyone in America

cancun spring breakers (not 10s according to us government)

Mandie S./Flickr

You think you’re a 10? The U.S. government disagrees.

Thousands of American students will be spring breaking abroad in the coming month, consuming massive amounts of tequila, and reveling in their youthful hotness. 

But they’re not as hot as they think they are, according to the U.S. State Department’s official travel advisory Twitter account: 

Twitter

You think the locals are hitting on you because you’re a 10? Nah, baby, you’re like a drunk 6 at best, according to U.S. government standards. Those spicy foreign hotties are just flirting for free drinks and the opportunity to steal your strong American dollars. And you know it’s true, ’cause it’s coming from a verified account. 

It appears the State Department has borrowed an old and gross technique called the “neg,” beloved by men who rebranded acting scummy as “pickup artistry.” The objective is to take your “target” down a peg so they’ll (theoretically) be desperate to win your approval, i.e., go home with you.

It is 2016, though, and everyone can see right through that tired, manipulative old game. Looks like the U.S. Department of State is not getting laid tonight. 

I’m joking, of course, but someone at State is certainly aware of the “neg” concept, as evidenced by this denial: 

Way to play it cool, guys. 

The Department of State has since apologized for taking the official position that Americans overestimate their own attractiveness.

Many un-hot Americans are played for suckers each year. The government just wants to make sure you’re not one of them. It’s looking out for your best interests, baby. Now, you wanna get out of here? Doesn’t look like you’ve got a whole lot else going on tonight.

Photo via Mandie S./Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

Jay Hathaway

Jay Hathaway

Jay Hathaway is a former senior writer who specialized in internet memes and weird online culture. He previously served as the Daily Dot’s news editor, was a staff writer at Gawker, and edited the classic websites Urlesque and Download Squad. His work has also appeared on nymag.com, suicidegirls.com, and the Morning News.