https://www.flickr.com/photos/ersu99/10571270565/in/photolist-9dbnYd-71muJX-cWN1i-7TU9oG-4tts5j-fFFS2D-7i9D18-71DboB-iY7GcH-5tAFHK-h79wrB-7ibwFL-diY5RH-dXvF1r-a32K7q-cXF5Ub-a32JCY-6C24Qq-eRLeC2-oCqKZT-p926H2-dR5jrK-qtpiDX-dGgGdH-ajMNHH-9rfQgF-oUTUYN-dXBfVw-6aFp9X-aMwZWv-9BAxTT-5WUjHx-afBjp1-dXB69o-bVGoYs-bkED2x-7UQT7-6aKy6A-6aKy2m-fr97vF-dbap1T-nUSd9N-23JMUF-hLdK5K-4uENTm-fr958i-kgizgs-bwrstz-nJcc3a-nJifGy

This parrot can’t stop reliving her last owners’ pre-divorce arguments

What it's really like to be henpecked.

Mar 1, 2020, 10:41 am*

Internet Culture

 

Miles Klee

When a marriage turns acrimonious, it’s a terrible mistake to “stay together for the kids”—or for the parrot, as the case may be. Really, the scars can last a lifetime whether the victim is a human or a bird.

Peaches, a Moluccan cockatoo adopted by Elaine and Don Sigmon of North Carolina, can testify—and boy, does she ever. Having previously lived with a couple that eventually separated, the bird goes through raging bouts of what sounds like connubial warfare “once or twice a day,” even gesturing aggressively. We can’t quite grasp the fine points of her argument, but her tone is unmistakable.

We’re not sure who’s more traumatized: Peaches, or this other parrot who overheard human sex.

H/T Huffington Post | Photo by Ersu/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

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*First Published: Feb 9, 2015, 1:24 pm