WeedPornDaily/Flickr (CC-BY)

The internet is lit.

Today is April 20, also known as 4/20, the day that everyone smokes a lot of weed. Even if you don’t celebrate the unofficial cannabis holiday, you probably have heard the number 420 before.

The origins of 420 are a little hazy, but it began as the time (4:20pm) that a group of California teens met up to get high and search for a marijuana garden in 1971. The teens also referred to themselves as “Waldos” and even made a 420 flag. Eventually, the number made its way into pop culture and became a part of internet slang, and 420 is now code for weed (or marijuana, or pot, or whatever name you prefer). Today, people celebrate 420 on 4/20 by lighting up.

On Twitter, you could definitely tell who was down with 4/20 and who was not. Celebrities, brands, and even public transit systems referenced the holiday.

Notable stoner Snoop Dogg tweeted on Thursday night: “Don’t forget to leave milk and cookies out 4 me tonight!”

On Friday, many others recognized the holiday with some great tweets. Louis Tomlinson of One Direction declared that it was “sick weather” for 420.

Denny’s recognized its legacy as a place for people to eat some diner food after getting really high.

“While it’s trendy to implement new 420 menus, denny’s has stayed ahead of the game by simply having…our menu,” the company wrote in a clever tweet.

Brands love this holiday.

So do public transit systems—as long as you don’t hotbox the trains.

Here are some other good 4/20 tweets:

Some helpfully distributed health tips, while others reminded people that Black people are arrested at a significantly higher rate than whites for marijuana possession.

And remember: If you don’t smoke weed, you can still wish everyone a Happy 4/20, like Ice-T:

Since weed is now legal in several states, the number of people who celebrate 4/20 is probably increasing, so you likely know at least one person getting high today. Happy blazing!

Tiffany Kelly

Tiffany Kelly

Tiffany Kelly is the Unclick editor at Daily Dot. Previously, she worked at Ars Technica and Wired. Her writing has appeared in several other print and online publications, including the Los Angeles Times, Popular Mechanics, and GQ.