Studio Ghibli/Slash Film

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Studio Ghibli films are known for their gorgeous animation, vibrant art design, and eloquent writing, but too often people forget they often come with incredible orchestral soundtracks. If you’re like me, maybe you’re on Spotify nearly all the time listening to Ghibli composer Joe Hisaishi’s stunning piano melodies from Spirited Away. Now fans will be able to listen to the soundtracks of some of Ghibli’s most prolific films on vinyl for the first time ever.

On Nov. 3, Ghibli is releasing the vinyl versions of the soundtracks to My Neighbor Totoro, Castle in the Sky, and Nausicaä of the Valley of Wind. That also happens to be Japanese Record Day, but more importantly, 2018 marks the 30th anniversary of My Neighbor Totoro, Hayao Miyazaki’s fourth directorial effort at Ghibli after Castle of Cagliostro, Nausicaä, and Castle in the Sky.

studio ghibli vinyl 2 HMV

The three soundtracks are all the work of Hisaishi, one of Japan’s most famous composers. His music has filled the worlds of other Ghibli films, including Princess Mononoke and Porco Rosso.

You can preorder the Totoro vinyl through HMV & Books for about 4,100 yen, which comes out to a little under $40 in the U.S.

Ghibli is also running a year-long screening event at various theaters across the country, showcasing each major Ghibli film on the big screen. My Neighbor Totoro is returning to theaters on Sept. 30 for a three-day run, followed by Spirited Away in October, and Castle in the Sky in November.

Studio Ghibli hasn’t been resting on its laurels, though. With Miyazaki once again returning from retirement to direct a new movie, the studio is also developing a new theme park based on its films. The studio released concept art that shows off the park’s whimsical designs, including inspirations from Princess Mononoke and Totoro’s cat bus. The park is scheduled to open in 2022, according to Japan Times.

H/T: Vice i-D

Joseph Knoop

Joseph Knoop

Joseph Knoop is a gaming writer for Daily Dot, a native Chicagoan, and a slave to all things Overwatch. He co-founded the college geek culture outlet ByteBSU, then interned at Game Informer, and now writes for a bunch websites his parents have never heard of.