The best way to watch ‘Game of Thrones’ is on an Iron Throne made of 200 dildos

The Iron Throne

HBO/YouTube

You know nothing of sex toy furniture, Jon Snow.

When Aegon the Conqueror, founder of the Targaryen dynasty, used his dragons to take over Westeros, he made all of the lords who swore their loyalty to him hand over their swords. Aegon took those weapons and forged them into the Iron Throne, the seat from which the king of Westeros has ruled for generations, even after Jamie Lannister ended the Targaryens’ reign by slaying the Mad King. 

The throne’s creation was a power move. Its existence is a constant reminder that any nobles who get ideas in their heads about taking on the ruling regime in King’s Landing may find themselves dead. In the world of George R. R. Martin, that’s far from an idle threat.

What it means when someone makes a replica of the Iron Throne replacing the swords with big, black dildos is a little less clear.

The Rubber Throne

The Rubber Throne

Bondera/YouTube

As a way to promote its new line of medieval-themed sex toys called, of course, Game of Bones, U.K.-based bondage supply company Bondara recreated the Iron Throne with about 200 dildos in 24 hours and then offered the chair up as the grand prize in a social media competition.

Just think: You could have your very own Rubber Throne, as the company calls it. It would be the perfect seat for the show’s new season. Or, if you’re making you own Breaking Bad fan film, the chair would be a pretty awesome place for Walter White to sit while running a destructive, amoral meth empire. Just saying.

Check out this video showing the throne’s construction. (Warning: Video contains 200 dildos.)

H/T Mashable | Screengrab via HBO/YouTube

Aaron Sankin

Aaron Sankin

Aaron Sankin is a former Senior Staff Writer at the Daily Dot who covered the intersection of politics, technology, online privacy, Twitter bots, and the role of dank memes in popular culture. He lives in Seattle, Washington. He joined the Center for Investigative Reporting in 2016.