McDonald's Big Mac | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
You may now resume sticking french fries up your nose.

Apparently, delinquent teens have been a problem of late at a McDonald’s location in southeast London’s Sidcup neighborhood—so management decided to do take a stand. Earlier this week, a misspelled sign was spotted in the window: “NO YOUTHS WILL BE SERVERD [sic] AFTER 7PM,” it read.

Predictably, this vague, illegal, and otherwise unenforceable fiat was met with ridicule and hostility on Twitter. The policy was especially galling since the latest newsworthy incidents at the fast food restaurant involved adult men (one tried to steal a chair and called a policewoman a “slag,” while the other burst in waving a samurai sword.)

It wasn’t long before McDonald’s HQ stepped in, with a spokeswoman reaffirming the franchise’s “family-friendly” atmosphere:

On Saturday evening, the restaurant experienced problems with a group of individuals causing sustained disruption to the restaurant, affecting fellow customers and employees. As a result, following consultation with local police, the restaurant management took urgent steps to try and prevent repeat anti-social behaviour. The wording of the initial signage displayed in the restaurant was incorrect and we apologise for any confusion caused.

A victory for the kids—but of the hollow sort:

Problem is, there’s no Burger King nearby.

H/T Metro | Photo by Scott/Flickr

Promoted Stories Powered by Sharethrough
Business
Samsung's response to a customer whose phone caught fire only made things worse
Damage control is a tricky thing: One wrong move can make a small crisis exponentially worse. Such is the case for Samsung, which moved to suppress YouTube evidence that its Galaxy S4 smartphone can catch fire for no reason at all, only to have the original poster call the company out for it in a second video that received five times as many views as the first.
backlash
NYPD's #myNYPD hashtag campaign backfires horribly
In an age where bystanders commonly use their phones to document abuses of power by law enforcement, it’s understandable that police want to turn something like Twitter to their advantage.
The Latest From Daily Dot Video
Group

Pure, uncut internet. Straight to your inbox.

Thanks for subscribing to our newsletter!