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Shia LaBeouf’s livestream shut down again after reports of gunshots

Shia LaBeouf livestream gunshots

Screengrab via YouTube

BTW

In another epic turn of events, Shia LaBeouf’s recently relocated anti-Trump livestream has yet again been shut down—this time, by his own accord after reports of gunshots.

LaBeouf announced the decision to turn the stream off in a tweet Thursday morning, saying that the safety of those participating in the project is “paramount.”   

In a clip from the livestream early Thursday, a man is seen standing in front of the camera speaking for several minutes before distant shots are heard. 

He Will Not Divide Us, LaBeouf’s controversial interactive installation— created in collaboration with artists Nastja Säde Rönkkö and Luke Turner—was relocated last week to the El Rey Theater in Albuquerque, New Mexico, after it was first shut down at its original location at the Museum of the Moving Image in Queens, New York. 

The museum closed the exhibit, citing concerns for public safety and the need for round-the-clock police presence. In a statement the museum referred to the installation as a “flashpoint for violence.” LaBeouf and his collaborators wrote on their website that the museum had “abandoned” them.

Though the artists called for this shutdown themselves, the livestream was also cut off temporarily on Tuesday after a masked vandal covered the camera in red spray paint just two days after its installment. The El Rey Theater removed the paint and restored the exhibit several hours after the incident.

He Will Not Divide Us was launched on Jan. 20, the day of President Trump’s inauguration, and was originally intended to stay in New York, streaming live for the duration of Trump’s presidency.

The Daily Dot has reached out to the Albuquerque police department to confirm reports of gunfire. As of Thursday afternoon no further updates have been posted to the police department’s Twitter account or to LaBeouf’s page.   

Lauren L'Amie

Lauren L'Amie

Lauren L'Amie is the SEO editor of the Daily Dot. Her work focuses on women and the internet, tech, and health. Previously, she has contributed to Tom's Guide and Texas Monthly. Currently, she is based in Brooklyn and becoming a keyword ninja.