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@savagexfenty/Twitter

Savage x Fenty drops next week.

After teasing fans with a cryptic Instagram post in April, Rihanna has confirmed she’ll be launching a new lingerie line called Savage x Fenty.

The collection of bras and underwear drops May 11 and runs up to size 44DDD—a wider size range than shoppers can find off-the-rack at stores like Victoria’s Secret. The advertising campaign is already highlighting models of all body types, something still relatively unheard of in the industry.

“Savages come in all shapes and sizes,” the pop star tweeted in late April.

Rihanna famously disrupted the beauty industry in 2017 with her 40-shade cosmetics line Fenty Beauty, providing many darker-complected makeup users with the first suite of products that actually matched their skin tone—so it’s safe to say she’s hoping lightning will strike twice. And honestly, judging by most fans’ reactions, it looks like she just might.

https://twitter.com/NicoleRitaaa/status/991699431027232768

The line might have some expanding to do, though, if it wants to live up to the size-inclusive hype. Many Twitter users have been pointing out that while the Savage x Fenty landing page allows users to identify as anything from a 32A to a 34DDD, other plus-bra brands run all the way to size L. So while Rihanna’s brand has dipped its toes into the plus market, it might not really offer a broad enough range of options to firmly hold the title of a plus-inclusive line in some people’s minds.

However, as one user fairly points out, Savage x Fenty still hasn’t launched yet—and there is an “other” option at the bottom of its sizing menu:

No matter how inclusive the range ends up being, it’s probably safe to say Savage x Fenty is about to make a splash in lingerie.

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Christine Friar

Christine Friar

Christine Friar is a writer and editor in New York who focuses on streaming entertainment and internet culture. Her work has appeared in the Awl, the Fader, New York Magazine, Paper Magazine, Vogue, Elle, and more.