PewDiePie rips Demi Lovato for tweeting about 21 Savage memes

Demi Lovato earlier this week deactivated her Twitter account after receiving a massive amount of backlash for sharing a 21 Savage meme on Super Bowl Sunday.

You know who enjoyed watching that controversy unfold? PewDiePie, the world’s most popular YouTube star, did.

PewDiePie was blasted last July for sharing an awful meme that made fun of a Lovato drug overdose and her long struggle with addiction. He later apologized, writing on Twitter, “Deleted meme. I didnt mean anything with it and I didnt fully know about the situation. I realize now it was insensitive, sorry!”

PewDiePie, though, hasn’t forgotten his own backlash, and in a video uploaded Thursday, he railed against the idea that Lovato was the one posting an insensitive meme.

“Demi Lovato, making fun of someone, posting a meme of someone,” he said. “Kicking on someone in their lowest form of their life. Hmm. … How could you sink so low? Demi Lovato out of all people… Demi why?”

PewDiePie seemed to be mostly joking. But his mocking probably wasn’t all made up. After all, he was heavily criticized for his own Lovato controversy.

The problem for Lovato began on Sunday when she wrote, “21 Savage memes have been my favorite part of the Super Bowl.” She later clarified that she wasn’t making fun of the rapper’s detainment by Immigration and Customs Enforcement, but the online damage had already been done.

PewDiePie was quick to pounce.

“Remember when I made fun of Demi Lovato when she was at her lowest and I posted a meme and I learned,” said PewDiePie, who has 84.5 million subscribers and is still barely holding off a challenge from T-Series for YouTube supremacy. “I manned up. I learned not to kick someone that’s down. … Take this as a learning opportunity, like I did. Woman up.”

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H/T Metro

Josh Katzowitz

Josh Katzowitz

Josh Katzowitz is a staff writer at the Daily Dot specializing in YouTube and boxing. His work has appeared in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, and Los Angeles Times. A longtime sports writer, he's covered the NFL for CBSSports.com and boxing for Forbes. His work has been noted twice in the Best American Sports Writing book series.