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World of Warcraft just got easier for players with color blindness

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Screengrab from the video introducing World of Warcraft patch 6.1

Blizzard Entertainment has taken another step to serve its diverse playerbase.

Blizzard Entertainment wants to make it easier for World of Warcraft players with color vision impairment to enjoy the game, and an upcoming patch will make it easier than ever.

World of Warcraft patch 6.1 will add an “accessibility interface configuration section” to the UI option tools. WoW depends heavily on use of color to allow players to distinguish between different levels of item rarity and to target specific players during player-versus-player combat, both of which can be very important in fast-paced gameplay. These upcoming changes therefore address fundamental improvements to WoW gameplay.

Specific filters for different types of anomalous trichromacy, or color vision impairment will be part of these new UI options settings. Anomalous trichromacy is defined by a reduced ability to distinguish wavelengths of light specific to certain colors. The new UI filters introduced by patch 6.1 will cater to specific, reduced color sensitivities by removing problematic wavelengths of light, and will also include sliders to increase or decrease the filter effects rather than instituting a “one-size-fits-all” approach.

World of Warcraft patch 6.1 also features Twitter integration, new activities like animal racing, and improvements to existing features like player garrisons. This video outlines what patch 6.1 has to offer (and unfortunately doesn’t discuss the new accessibility options).

Patch 6.1 will go live on Feb. 24.

H/T Eurogamer | Screengrab via World of Warcraft/YouTube

Dennis Scimeca

Dennis Scimeca

Dennis Scimeca was the Daily Dot's gaming reporter until 2016. He loves first-person shooters, role-playing games, and massively multiplayer online games. His work has appeared in Salon, NPR, Ars Technica, Kotaku, Polygon, Gamasutra, GamesBeat, Paste, and Mic.