The Disney Princesses get political in this ‘Women’s March’ series

BTW

We’ve seen Disney Princesses reimagined as everything from puppies to cement mixers, but in this new illustrated series, these women dare push the envelope as protesters in President Donald Trump‘s America.

The series, created by illustrator Amanda Allen Niday, depicts Princesses Tiana, Mulan, Jasmine, and others, turning their classic, quotable fairytale quips into messages of hope and change.

“Bright young women, sick of swimming, ready to stand,” Ariel’s picket reads, quoting her song, “Part of Your World.”

“How can there be so much that you don’t know,” Pocahontas’s poster questions, following the intro to her song, “Colors of the Wind.”

Niday told Teen Vogue that her series was inspired by January’s Women’s March on Washington that took place the day after President Trump’s inauguration.

“I felt inspired by the way women expressed themselves on their signs, from the witty and charming to the downright scathing … I wanted to hold onto that message as my newsfeeds dissolved back into squabbling and finding faults in our difference, rather than understanding,” Niday said.

To capture that feeling, Niday decided to use the quotes from the characters themselves instead of impressing her own ideas upon them: “I didn’t want to put words into their mouths … I chose quotes from their movies, mostly spoken by the heroine herself, and tried to pick moments that would allude to their story as whole, had deeper meaning within the movie, or referenced modern issues.”

http://amandaniday.tumblr.com/post/157027984127/inspired-by-the-womens-march-and-my-firm-belief

Click through Niday’s Tumblr post above to see the individual Disney Princess illustrations, or read her Teen Vogue interview here.

H/T Amy Poehler’s Smart Girls

Samantha Grasso

Samantha Grasso

Samantha Grasso is a former IRL staff writer for the Daily Dot with a reporting emphasis on immigration. Her work has appeared on Los Angeles Magazine, Death And Taxes, Revelist, Texts From Last Night, Austin Monthly, and she has previously contributed to Texas Monthly.