You can’t get a coffee IV, so get a caffeine vaporizer instead

A true coffee addict would snort coffee beans if it meant getting their fix faster. Now they have the next best thing: Eagle Energy wants to be the vaporizer for coffee lovers.

Eagle Energy, which is almost halfway to its $30,000 funding goal on IndieGoGo, is encouraging people to inhale their caffeine instead of drinking it. Eagle Energy’s marketing director, Matt Lang, told the Daily Dot the vaporizer was born after company president Elliot Mashford “saw [a] coffee-flavoured vaporizer and realized they had no functional benefit beyond flavour. So he figured out how to actually incorporate an energy boost and put the team together to bring it to life.”

The vaporizer doesn’t come with cream or sugar, but instead with a mix of ginseng and taurine blended with the highly caffeinated guarana plant.

You can think of guarana as a Portuguese word meaning “even more caffeine”; the extract contains twice as much caffeine as its coffee bean equivalent. This vaporizer packs a punch.

Eagle Energy turns this blend of natural ingredients into a vaporizer that contains about 500 puffs of the booster. Sensors inside the thin tube can tell when a user draws in a breath, at which point heaters vaporize the mix into a puff for a high-energy hit.

While there is no expiration date, Eagle Energy suggests a stick should last about three days for a heavy user. In terms of serving size, Lang said, “We recommend 10-20 puffs depending on your sensitivity to caffeine.”

He also noted that thinking of Eagle Energy in the same way as other alternatives isn’t exactly an apples-to-apples comparison.

“The one thing the press has been getting a bit wrong is the idea that people use it constantly and use way too much,” Lang explained. “One of the benefits of Eagle is because it bypasses the digestive system, you feel it much quicker, giving the user more control. You stop when you feel it, not when the can is empty. That’s one of the problems we were trying to solve. With drinks, the immediacy of effect isn’t there so it’s actually a lot easier to take in more caffeine than your body actually needs.”

The Eagle Energy Vaporizer contains 0.08 percent caffeine content per milliliter. For comparison’s sake, a Monster energy drink reaches about 0.033 percent per mL; a cup of coffee, depending on a considerable amount of variables, sits at around 0.068 percent; a 5-Hour Energy, meanwhile, reaches nearly .34 percent.

Although 5-Hour Energy bottles might seem like the best option for a boost, Eagle Energy argues that vaping is better because there is no sugar or calories, which helps prevent against crashes. 5-Hour Energy’s similar claim—there is no sugar in the drink—has been widely disputed. Even an unpublished study commissioned by the distributors of 5-Hour Energy found that 25 percent of people experienced moderate to severe crashes when using the product.

Studies have also shown that removing sugar does indeed reduce the likelihood of a crash—sugary energy drinks like Red Bull and Monster had crash rates of more than 75 percent—but there’s still no way to guarantee that one won’t occur.

And then there’s the vaping aspect, which might not be the best term for Eagle Energy, as it doesn’t pose the same potential hazards as standard e-cigarettes or vaporizers simply on account of what’s inside.

“Vaping is a broad term and can be used to describe the consumption of various substances,” Lang explained. “Eagle Energy uses a unique formula that was created to facilitate the inhalation of guarana, which is an organic plant extract. There are no known toxicological synergies among compounds in our formula, and our ingredients do not pose a risk to health.”

Instead of looking at Eagle Energy as a sure solution to caffeine crashes, look at it for what it is: a different way to get your fix. If you find drinking coffee to be torturous, a few puffs of energy vape might be a better way to get you through the day. If you’re hardcore about your coffee—well, who’s to say you can’t supplement your caffeine intake between cups with a few hits?H/T PSFK | Screengrab via Eagle Energy Vapor/YouTube

AJ Dellinger

AJ Dellinger

AJ Dellinger is a seasoned technology writer whose work has appeared in Digital Trends, International Business Times, and Newsweek. In 2018, he joined Gizmodo as the nights and weekend editor.