Twitch used streamer Mexican Andy in a promo—even though he’s permanently banned

BTW

The streamer known as Mexican Andy has been banned on Twitch for the past two years. But that didn’t stop the streaming platform from using an old video of his that was actually broadcast on another site to promote Twitch.

Mexican Andy, whose real name is Andy Martin, was exiled by Twitch after the IRL streamer repeatedly broke the site’s terms of service rules. Since then, Martin has migrated to YouTube where he has nearly 44,000 subscribers and where he occasionally live streams himself.

But the fact Twitch temporarily used him to promote itself was quite a surprise after Rod Breslau, a popular esports consultant, revealed the video on Twitter. Soon after Breslau’s tweet, Martin was removed from the promo ad and replaced by streamer NickEh30.

Martin responded by writing, “Lmao wtf that’s me.” He also wrote, “I just woke up from being drunk and all I gotta say is Wtf LMAOO.”

Breslau answered that with a slight burn, writing, “This is the closest you’ll be to being back on Twitch.”

Here’s the ad that originally featured Martin.

Twitch is using banned streamer Mexican Andy to promote their Fortnite section from LivestreamFail

As Dexerto notes, Martin’s enthusiastic Fortnite dance wasn’t even originally streamed on Twitch. Thanks to his ban from Twitch, that clip was streamed directly onto YouTube.

Either way, the inclusion of a banned streamer isn’t a good look for Twitch. Especially since the content wasn’t made for Twitch in the first place. “Of the literal tens of thousands of different clips Twitch could have picked to represent Fortnite, the biggest game on the entire site, they chose this one,” Breslau wrote. “It’s just extremely poor optics.”

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Josh Katzowitz

Josh Katzowitz

Josh Katzowitz is a staff writer at the Daily Dot specializing in YouTube and boxing. His work has appeared in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, and Los Angeles Times. A longtime sports writer, he's covered the NFL for CBSSports.com and boxing for Forbes. His work has been noted twice in the Best American Sports Writing book series.