Loona stans take over Twitter with praise for the ‘Butterfly’ video

K-pop girl band Loona (styled as LOOΠΔ) dropped a new music video at 4:00am ET (6:00 p.m. KT) on Tuesday for “Butterfly,” its latest single and the title track of repackaged album [x x] (originally called  [+ +], read as “plus plus”). It’s the group’s long-awaited comeback music video, Korean pop culture website Soompi reports, following the August release of their second single, “Hi High.”

The group’s fandom flooded Twitter hours before the music video went live while rallying different fan groups (some of whom call themselves “Orbits”) to make #Loona_Butterfly and #Loonaiscomingback gain momentum for the music.

Both hashtags became top U.S. trending topics early Tuesday.

https://twitter.com/lipysoul/status/1097781708169060353

https://twitter.com/loonastats/status/1097782616525361152

https://twitter.com/hagsoul/status/1097767478334287873

https://twitter.com/pastryvivi/status/1097785738337402880

There’s an actual checklist of goals, guys. The band wants worldwide trending topics, millions of YouTube views, and iTunes attention.

The visually compelling video matches the song’s catchy beat and most notable verse, “Fly like a butterfly,” which even trended on Twitter at one point. Give it a watch below.

The video caption accompanying the video includes a myth-like introduction of how the group—made up of HeeJin, HyunJin, HaSeul, YeoJin, Kim Lip, JinSoul, Choerry, Yves, Chuu, Go Won, Olivia Hye, and ViVi—was formed by Blockberry Creative (called BBC by fans).

As the Daily Dot reported last year, Loona is a reverse-engineered K-pop group, “due to the unique way its 12 members were revealed. Rather than debuting as a full group, members have been slowly revealed with single albums, starting in October 2016 and finishing [in March 2018] with its final member. The group is also split into three sub-units based on when they were introduced, and the latest unit, Loona yyxy, released a song on May 31 featuring Grimes.”

(The same report involved how the latter caused a branch of the Loona fan base to target Elon Musk—showing you just how vocal the stans can get.)

Shortly after the music video was released, Twitter erupted with stans praising everything from the choreography and visuals to the message and the “representation” showcased in the clip.

https://twitter.com/winter_dove128/status/1097785598406844417

https://twitter.com/ikran/status/1097810738348023809

There were updates on YouTube views, with encouragement to “keep streaming.”

https://twitter.com/INTL_LOONA/status/1097791037337157633

A lot of fans posted lengthy, almost reverential interpretations of the music video. Some call it a “powerful” message of “women empowerment,” “inclusion,” and “diversity.”

https://twitter.com/TRlVlAMONOS/status/1097789863674499073

https://twitter.com/lipwoncafe/status/1097795072022794240

https://twitter.com/hanavbara/status/1097798290756771840

Fans believe “we are all Loona.”

“Loona … encourages us to be [ourselves] and ‘fly like a butterfly’; they aimed this for the world,” @lossianlulette tweets.

Even the backdrop has meaning: “The black rocks/mountains reminds me of HaSeul’s MV. Maybe they are in HaSeul’s cold heart and trying to warm it up and encourage her to love herself and fly like a butterfly,” @bchillii theorizes.

https://twitter.com/bchillii/status/1097796561550028800

Whether or not you understand the meaning of the music video and most of the lyrics, you can’t deny it’s the perfectly upbeat #TuesdayMotivation track to get you “flying like a butterfly” through this week. Just maybe don’t be like @loveletter3gp, who tweeted, “I’m streaming #Butterfly at my workplace because I want my boss to hear it too.”

Trixie Reyna

Trixie Reyna

Trixie Reyna-Benedicto is a lifestyle editor and writer based in the Philippines. Previously, she helmed Cosmopolitan Philippines’ website, Cosmo.ph, as its founding editor. She later served as editor-in-chief of lifestyle and entertainment portals for Manila-based media company TV5. Her work has appeared in several print and online publications in her country, and she contributes to Speed Magazine, DG Traveler, and Connected Women, among others. Visit her website, trixiereyna.com.