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BTW

If you already watch enough television for it to qualify as a job, you’re in luck. How to Watch is offering a chance to make that a reality.

How to Watch’s contest, as it’s being called, offers $2,000 to someone who will watch TV for them and report back on what they find.

“We’re looking for a binge-watcher or tech junkie who already knows a thing or two about streaming,” reads the listing on How To Watch’s website. “Our dream candidate is also an active Twitter and/or Reddit user who feels comfortable sharing their experiences along the way.”

The person who wins the contest will basically be tasked with testing out and offering your assessment on seven different streaming platforms. You’ll need to spend about 14 hours apiece watching live TV on DirecTV Now, FuboTV, Hulu with Live TV, Philo, PlayStation Vue, Sling TV, and YouTube TV, which How to Watch will give you free access to while you test them out. There doesn’t appear to be a restriction on what you can watch through each of those services. Once you’ve tested out the services, you’ll be given a score sheet to fill out and help set a grade for each respective platform.

While you can watch whenever you’d like, you’ll need to complete all 100 hours by Nov. 1.

The contest is essentially a job application. How to Watch calls it a “contracted position,” and minus possible taxes, it breaks down to around $20 an hour. Participants will need to be at least 18 years old, know what makes for high-quality video, have a love of TV. You don’t have to have experience writing reviews before, but it’s certainly a plus.

With nothing to do but turn on the TV, you’re sure to stumble upon some quality entertainment. You can enter the contest, aka apply for the job, on How to Watch’s website.

Michelle Jaworski

Michelle Jaworski

Michelle Jaworski is a staff writer and the resident Game of Thrones expert at the Daily Dot. She covers entertainment, geek culture, and pop culture and has brought her knowledge to conventions like Con of Thrones. She is based in New Jersey.

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