You will definitely want this wearable bed from Japan

We have wearable tech that tracks our fitness levels. We have wearable tech that charges our cell phones. We even have wearable tech that helps protect you from assault. But by far the most important development in wearable technology is the Wearable Futon Air Mat Set, a coat that transforms into an air mattress.

Created by the Japanese office supply brand King Jim, the $40 garment is basically a nylon and polyester blue puffy coat that doubles as bedding. If the above photo is any indication, it’s intended for use at the office if you’re working late nights, but you could theoretically also whip it out in any location that’s not intended for sleeping, from banks to zoos to, I don’t know, dollhouse supply stores? Any place you’re not supposed to sleep.

The coat fastens at the neck, and the sleeves and pant legs can be adjusted for different heights. It also includes an air mat that can be folded up into a small bag, so all you have to do is roll it out onto the ground and you’ll be ready to catch some Zzzs.

Like most wearables, the wearable futon presents one major obstacle: It doesn’t look like anything you’d, you know, actually want to wear in public. It looks less like an item of clothing than a robe worn by high-ranking members of a creepy, post-apocalyptic society.

That having been said, I’m a big fan of anything that makes it easier to take a nap in places where one doesn’t normally take naps, especially when it doubles as an instant conversation-ender. Think about it: If you’re at a party and the conversation is getting dull, what better way is there to express your disinterest than to wordlessly roll this baby out and fall asleep on the floor? Actually, this wearable mattress might be the greatest thing that has ever happened to me. Sign me up for one in every colors!

H/T Daily Mail | Photo via Japan Trend Shop 

EJ Dickson

EJ Dickson

EJ Dickson is a writer and editor who primarily covers sex, dating, and relationships, with a special focus on the intersection of intimacy and technology. She served as the Daily Dot’s IRL editor from January 2014 to July 2015. Her work has since appeared in the New York Times, Rolling Stone, Mic, Bustle, Romper, and Men’s Health.