Tile’s new object tracker can stick to almost anything

Tile’s Bluetooth trackers make it easy to find lost items. Attach one of the company’s iconic plastic squares to your keys or wallet, and if you ever misplace them, your stuff will emit a shrill noise that identifies their whereabouts in moments.

Now, the company behind them has overhauled its entire lineup, added updated versions of the Tile Slim, Mate, and Mate Pro products, as well as a new Tile sticker.

The Tile Sticker is arguably the most interesting addition: It allows the user to track anything the adhesive can attach to. This makes it possible to use Tile’s tracking technology with a broader range of “dumb” devices, like, for example, a remote control.

tile sticker

Tile partnered with 3M, the creator of the post-it note, to develop the adhesive substance used in the sticker. It comes with a three-year battery span, a 150-ft range, and is waterproof.

The Tile Slim has also seen a major upgrade, having been shrunk to the size of a credit card. This makes it easier to fit into a wallet, but Tile hopes the device will be used in places where space comes at a premium, like in luggage.

With the Mate and Mate Pro, Tile has focused predominantly on performance, adding extra range. The premium Pro model, for example, now works over distances of 400ft. While that’s perhaps overkill for those looking for their buried keys, it makes the device more useful for open environments, like airports or warehouses.

This new lineup demonstrates the incredible potential for Bluetooth LE technology. It’s genuinely impressive to see how Tile has managed to miniaturize it to the point that it can be used in the form of a sticker.

This fits into Tile’s current strategy of trying to insert its tracking tech into as many places as possible. Bolstered by $45 million of funding in June, Tile has embarked upon several key partnerships with companies as diverse as Skullcandy and Qualcomm.

It could indicate new challenges for Tile rivals, like Chipolo. As Tile’s dominance of the market deepens, it’ll inevitably end up as the default standard for object tracking.

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