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Here’s where iOS 8.3 hid all your favorite emoji

The latest iOS update brought a ton of new emoji, but also reorganized all your old favorites. We'll help you find them.

Mar 1, 2020, 6:09 am*

Tech

 

AJ Dellinger

Apple rolled out updates to both iOS and OS X yesterday and while there are plenty of tweaks and changes in both operating system, we all know the real reason to upgrade are the new emoji. OS X 10.10.3 and iOS 8.3 bring the long-promised diverse emoji set, a welcome and overdue addition.

The new set of unicode characters brings with it a change to the layout of Apple’s emoji, which had been untouched from iOS 6 to iOS 8.2. All of that familiarity you built with your favorite icos has gone out the window. If you’re freaking out because you can’t find your frequently used characters, don’t worry, we got you. (Just make sure your friends have hit the iOS update as well, or it’ll look like you’re threatening to abduct them.)

Hearts

If you heart the heart emoji, you might panic when you find it absent from its usual place. Previously on the back page of the “People” tab in the emoji menu, the heart has moved over to the “Celebration” section. You’ll find it on the first page of characters there.

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“See No Evil, Hear No Evil, Speak No Evil” monkeys

Previously listed under “People,” the monkeys have moved over to the “Nature” section, where the standard monkey emoji has been the whole time. Still under the “People” section, though, are cats with human emotions.

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Hand emoji

The addition of new family emoji (including same sex couples!) and other human characters have pushed the hand emoji back. You’ll still find them in the “People” category, but they’re now a few extra scrolls deeper into the list.

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Food emoji

All of the food emoji, which were previously stored on the back pages of the catchall “Objects” menu, have moved into their very own section. Everything edible is now in the “Food and Drink” menu.

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Still inexplicably absent: cheese, but it’s being rectified.

Santa Claus

For whatever reason, jolly ol’ Saint Nick used to be in the “Objects” section of the emoji menu. But Santa Claus is not an object. In the updated menu he’s not only recognized as a person, he can also be any number of diverse versions of the Christmas icon.

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The poop emoji, on the other hand, has been and continues to be categorized under “People.”

Ghost

The ghost, like Santa Claus, was kept under “Objects” but has now moved to “People.” Technically the ghost probably was a person at one point, so it makes some kind of sense.

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Party popper, balloon, and confetti ball

With the new “Celebrations” menu, all of your party-related emoji have moved from “Objects” to their own dedicated location.

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Sports emoji

All of the sports emoji, ranging from balls to biking and horse racing, have left the “Objects” menu in favor of the new “Activity” section.

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Music emoji

Like sports, the music-related characters have shifted over to the new “Activity” section.

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Performing arts

The masks of comedy and tragedy, which were kept under “Travel,” now slide over to Activity. Joining it in the shift: the circus tent, carousel horse, ferris wheel, slot machine, and roller coaster.

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Clothing

All the clothes have left the “People” category and now are in “Objects and Symbols.”

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Everything else

Tons of emoji that were scattered about in a variety of categories that didn’t really make all that much sense have now been shifted to a section called “Objects and Symbols.” The barber shop pole and hot springs sign left “Travel” for “Objects,” for example.

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The new Apple Watch and iPhone emojis are also in “Objects and Symbols.” If there’s anything you can’t find, it’s probably hiding here. 

Photo via downloadsource.fr/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

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*First Published: Apr 10, 2015, 10:13 am