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This men’s health app keeps track of your ‘boner streaks’

Sau Rieng Nguyen/Flickr (CC-BY)

There is now an app for literally everything.

The next time you wake up with an erection, grab your smartphone.

No, not for that thing you’re thinking about. Do it for your health.

An app called Morning Glory motivates men to log their “boner streaks.” What sounds like a lame public relations stunt was actually developed for a serious cause: To raise awareness about an overly stigmatized men’s health topic. Waking up with an erection means you have a healthy blood flow to your penis—and waking up without one could indicate an underlying condition, like heart disease, blocked blood vessels, high cholesterol, or high blood pressure.

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“One of the best indicators of a guy’s overall health is whether or not he wakes up with an erection,” a company spokesperson told Inverse. “If you wake up with morning wood it means your blood flow and hormones are working properly, and that you’re at a lower risk for things like diabetes, heart diseases, or other chronic diseases.”

Built by startup Roman, the app bluntly asks users every morning, “Did you wake up with morning wood?” You might be wondering why you’d respond to such a daft question. But answer yes, and you’ll be treated to a confidence-boosting GIF and fun penis facts. If you answer “yes” three times in a row, the app will throw you a confetti party. Consistently answer “No,” and it may be time to visit a physician. Roman will even offer you a free consultation with one of its clinical directors before you schedule an appointment.

Morning Glory is available on iOS. If you’re embarrassed to download it, then you’re getting a glimpse of why it was made in the first place.

Phillip Tracy

Phillip Tracy

Phillip Tracy is a former technology staff writer at the Daily Dot. He's an expert on smartphones, social media trends, and gadgets. He previously reported on IoT and telecom for RCR Wireless News and contributed to NewBay Media magazine. He now writes for Laptop magazine.