Facebook search extends to stickers

Facebook is expanding its search capabilities, and one unexpected place in particular will make Pusheen fans extra excited. You can now search for stickers when you want to share the social network’s emojis in Facebook comments or in messages on the Web.

The Daily Dot discovered this new functionality on Wednesday, but it started rolling out in October.

Previously, if you wanted to share a sticker, you’d have to scroll through a particular group of stickers, like Pusheen or Biscuit. Now, you can simply enter a search term and a variety of stickers from different sticker packs will pop up.

Impressively, Facebook actually recognizes natural-language search, so you can type in slang terms like “nom,” “bro,” and “OMG” and get a list of associated stickers that fit a particular search term. And the stickers are shockingly accurate.

Screencap via Facebook

Screencap via Facebook

 This bodes well for Facebook’s new expanded Graph Search that will let people search for specific posts, and could potentially change the way we interact with Facebook. For the social network to quickly and accurately show posts with search terms with associated content, there are endless opportunities to relive old memories, or drum up embarrassing status updates long assumed lost to the Facebook past.

Sticker search isn’t available on mobile yet, but it could potentially be available when Graph Search comes to mobile devices. We’ve reached out to Facebook for comment on when mobile users will get access to sticker search.

Facebook rolled out sticker capabilities in comments in October, and news feeds quickly filled up with the cute, graphic icons—now it will be even easier to share them with friends. 

Update, 2:55 p.m.: Updated to reflect Facebook started rolling out sticker search in October.

Photo by m01229/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

Selena Larson

Selena Larson

Selena Larson is a technology reporter based in San Francisco who writes about the intersection of technology and culture. Her work explores new technologies and the way they impact industries, human behavior, and security and privacy. Since leaving the Daily Dot, she's reported for CNN Money and done technical writing for cybersecurity firm Dragos.